PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Running wheel exercise reduces α-synuclein aggregation and improves motor and cognitive function in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

Abstract Exercise has been recommended to improve motor function in Parkinson patients, but its value in altering progression of disease is unknown. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effects of running wheel exercise in mice. In adult wild-type mice, one week of running wheel activity led to significantly increased DJ-1 protein concentrations in muscle and plasma. In DJ-1 knockout mice, running wheel performance was much slower and Rotarod performance was reduced, suggesting that DJ-1 protein is required for normal motor activity. To see if exercise can prevent abnormal protein deposition and behavioral decline in transgenic animals expressing a mutant human form of α-synuclein in all neurons, we set up running wheels in the cages of pre-symptomatic animals at 12 months old. Activity was monitored for a 3-month period. After 3 months, motor and cognitive performance on the Rotarod and Morris Water Maze were significantly better in running animals compared to control transgenic animals with locked running wheels. Biochemical analysis revealed that running mice had significantly higher DJ-1, Hsp70 and BDNF concentrations and had significantly less α-synuclein aggregation in brain compared to control mice. By contrast, plasma concentrations of α-synuclein were significantly higher in exercising mice compared to control mice. Our results suggest that exercise may slow the progression of Parkinson's disease by preventing abnormal protein aggregation in brain.
PMID
Related Publications

Early motor deficits in mouse disease models are reliably uncovered using an automated home-cage wheel-running system: a cross-laboratory validation.

Transgenic mice overexpressing tyrosine-to-cysteine mutant human alpha-synuclein: a progressive neurodegenerative model of diffuse Lewy body disease.

"Brain training" improves cognitive performance and survival in a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze.

Wheel running from a juvenile age delays onset of specific motor deficits but does not alter protein aggregate density in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos one
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29272304
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
LR  - 20171222
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017
TI  - Running wheel exercise reduces alpha-synuclein aggregation and improves motor and
      cognitive function in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.
PG  - e0190160
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0190160 [doi]
AB  - Exercise has been recommended to improve motor function in Parkinson patients,
      but its value in altering progression of disease is unknown. In this study, we
      examined the neuroprotective effects of running wheel exercise in mice. In adult 
      wild-type mice, one week of running wheel activity led to significantly increased
      DJ-1 protein concentrations in muscle and plasma. In DJ-1 knockout mice, running 
      wheel performance was much slower and Rotarod performance was reduced, suggesting
      that DJ-1 protein is required for normal motor activity. To see if exercise can
      prevent abnormal protein deposition and behavioral decline in transgenic animals 
      expressing a mutant human form of alpha-synuclein in all neurons, we set up
      running wheels in the cages of pre-symptomatic animals at 12 months old. Activity
      was monitored for a 3-month period. After 3 months, motor and cognitive
      performance on the Rotarod and Morris Water Maze were significantly better in
      running animals compared to control transgenic animals with locked running
      wheels. Biochemical analysis revealed that running mice had significantly higher 
      DJ-1, Hsp70 and BDNF concentrations and had significantly less alpha-synuclein
      aggregation in brain compared to control mice. By contrast, plasma concentrations
      of alpha-synuclein were significantly higher in exercising mice compared to
      control mice. Our results suggest that exercise may slow the progression of
      Parkinson's disease by preventing abnormal protein aggregation in brain.
FAU - Zhou, Wenbo
AU  - Zhou W
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-5966-4483
AD  - Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Departments of Medicine,
      Pharmacology, Neurology, and Neurosurgery; University of Colorado Denver, School 
      of Medicine, Aurora, CO, United States of America.
FAU - Barkow, Jessica Cummiskey
AU  - Barkow JC
AD  - Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Departments of Medicine,
      Pharmacology, Neurology, and Neurosurgery; University of Colorado Denver, School 
      of Medicine, Aurora, CO, United States of America.
FAU - Freed, Curt R
AU  - Freed CR
AD  - Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Departments of Medicine,
      Pharmacology, Neurology, and Neurosurgery; University of Colorado Denver, School 
      of Medicine, Aurora, CO, United States of America.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20171222
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
EDAT- 2017/12/23 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/23 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/23 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/02 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/12/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/12/23 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/23 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/23 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0190160 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-17-28763 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Dec 22;12(12):e0190160. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0190160.
      eCollection 2017.