PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Prevention and treatment of electrical burn injury: much progresses achieved yet further efforts still needed.

Abstract Electrical burn injury is very common, including electrical contact burn, electrical arc burn, and lightning burn, etc. Electrical burn patients account for 0.04 to 5 percent of all burn victims in the developed countries, while it hit up to 27 percent in the developing countries, much more than the global average of 4.5 percent. Historical and recent data have shown that the electrical burn injuries in China, either for the case number, the proportion of burn patients in hospital, or the population incidence per year, are much higher than those of the developed countries and the global average. Before the 1960s, conservative treatment or skin grafts after repeated debridements were used for electrical burns, resulting in high rates of amputation and severe deformity. In the 1960s, transplantation of flaps after debridement in early stage were used for repairing wrist electrical burn wounds, breaking through the traditional conservative methods. In the 1980s, local, distant and island pedicled skin or myocutaneous flaps were widely used for early stage repair of electrical burn wounds. In recent years, along with the increasing experience of evaluating the blood vessel injuries and the development of microsurgical techniques, free flaps have been more and more used to cover the deep wounds of electrical burns in early stage, leading to much better effects and shorter length of hospital stay. With the persistent efforts of the burn specialists in the last decades, great improvements have been made for the treatment of electrical burn injuries in China. Future study on decoding the full mechanism of electrical burn injury, exploring new methods to save the injured but not yet necrotic tissue, are still needed to improve the treatment and reduce amputation and deformity of electrical burn injury.
PMID
Related Publications

Early treatment of high-voltage electric burn wound in the limbs.

Effects of flap or myocutaneous flap combined with fascia lata or composite mesh on repairing severe high-voltage electrical burn wounds in abdomen of patients.

Effects of flow-through descending branch of lateral circumflex femoral artery flap on repairing high-voltage electrical burn wounds of wrist of patients.

Epidemiological investigation on 2 133 hospitalized patients with electrical burns.

Wound repair and functional reconstruction of high-voltage electrical burns in wrists.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Debridement

Skin Transplantation

Surgical Flaps

Keywords

Burns, electric

Epidemiology

Prevention

Treatment

Journal Title zhonghua shao shang za zhi = zhonghua shaoshang zazhi = chinese journal of burns
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29275612
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180105
LR  - 20180105
IS  - 1009-2587 (Print)
IS  - 1009-2587 (Linking)
VI  - 33
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Dec 20
TI  - [Prevention and treatment of electrical burn injury: much progresses achieved yet
      further efforts still needed].
PG  - 728-731
LID - 10.3760/cma.j.issn.1009-2587.2017.12.002 [doi]
AB  - Electrical burn injury is very common, including electrical contact burn,
      electrical arc burn, and lightning burn, etc. Electrical burn patients account
      for 0.04 to 5 percent of all burn victims in the developed countries, while it
      hit up to 27 percent in the developing countries, much more than the global
      average of 4.5 percent. Historical and recent data have shown that the electrical
      burn injuries in China, either for the case number, the proportion of burn
      patients in hospital, or the population incidence per year, are much higher than 
      those of the developed countries and the global average. Before the 1960s,
      conservative treatment or skin grafts after repeated debridements were used for
      electrical burns, resulting in high rates of amputation and severe deformity. In 
      the 1960s, transplantation of flaps after debridement in early stage were used
      for repairing wrist electrical burn wounds, breaking through the traditional
      conservative methods. In the 1980s, local, distant and island pedicled skin or
      myocutaneous flaps were widely used for early stage repair of electrical burn
      wounds. In recent years, along with the increasing experience of evaluating the
      blood vessel injuries and the development of microsurgical techniques, free flaps
      have been more and more used to cover the deep wounds of electrical burns in
      early stage, leading to much better effects and shorter length of hospital stay. 
      With the persistent efforts of the burn specialists in the last decades, great
      improvements have been made for the treatment of electrical burn injuries in
      China. Future study on decoding the full mechanism of electrical burn injury,
      exploring new methods to save the injured but not yet necrotic tissue, are still 
      needed to improve the treatment and reduce amputation and deformity of electrical
      burn injury.
FAU - Xie, W G
AU  - Xie WG
AD  - Institute of Burns, Tongren Hospital of Wuhan University & Wuhan Third Hospital, 
      Wuhan 430060, China.
LA  - chi
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - China
TA  - Zhonghua Shao Shang Za Zhi
JT  - Zhonghua shao shang za zhi = Zhonghua shaoshang zazhi = Chinese journal of burns
JID - 100959418
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Amputation
MH  - Burns, Electric/*prevention & control/*therapy
MH  - China
MH  - *Debridement
MH  - Female
MH  - Free Tissue Flaps
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Myocutaneous Flap
MH  - Necrosis
MH  - *Skin Transplantation
MH  - *Surgical Flaps
MH  - Vascular System Injuries
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Burns, electric
OT  - Epidemiology
OT  - Prevention
OT  - Treatment
EDAT- 2017/12/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/06 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/26 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/06 06:00 [medline]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Zhonghua Shao Shang Za Zhi. 2017 Dec 20;33(12):728-731.