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Changes of platelet rheological behavior and the interventional effects of ulinastatin in rats with high-voltage electrical burns.

Abstract Objective: To explore the influence of high-voltage electrical burns on the number of platelet aggregation, β-thromboglobulin (β-TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF-4) and the interventional effects of ulinastatin in rats with high-voltage electrical burns. Methods: A total of 240 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham injury (SI) group, simple electrical burn (SEB) group, normal saline (NS) group, and ulinastatin (UTI) group according to the random number table, with 60 rats in each group. The electrical current was applied to the outside proximal part of left forelimb of rats and exited from the outside proximal part of right hind limb of rats. Rats in groups SEB, NS, and UTI were inflicted with high-voltage electrical burn wounds of 1 cm×1 cm at current entrances and exits, with the voltage regulator and experimental transformer. Rats in group SI were sham injured through connecting the same equipments without electricity. At 2 min post injury, rats in group NS were intraperitoneally injected with 2 mL/kg NS, and rats in group UTI were intraperitoneally injected with 2×10(4) U/kg UTI of 10 g/L. At 15 min before injury and 5 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h post injury, 10 rats in each group were selected to collect 5-7 mL blood of heart respectively. Blood of 0.05 mL were collected to make fresh blood smear for observing the number of platelet aggregation, and serum were separated from the remaining blood to determine content of β-TG and PF-4 with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were processed with analysis of factorial design of variance, student-Newman-Keuls test, Kruskal-Wallis H test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and Bonferroni correction. Results: (1) At 15 min before injury, the numbers of platelet aggregation of rats were close among groups SI, SEB, NS and UTI (5.9±1.2, 5.8±1.2, 5.9±1.3, 5.9±1.1, respectively, with P values above 0.05). At 5 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h post injury, the numbers of platelet aggregation of rats in group SEB were 57.2±16.3, 59.1±16.9, 60.8±20.6, 83.6±24.9, and 83.4±30.3, respectively, obviously more than those in group SI (6.0±1.3, 6.0±1.4, 5.9±1.4, 5.7±1.1, and 5.8±1.3, respectively, with P values below 0.001); the numbers of platelet aggregation of rats in group UTI were 29.6±7.4, 31.9±10.1, 35.0±14.2, 43.0±13.6, and 35.2±11.1, respectively, obviously more than those in group NS (58.3±16.1, 63.9±18.0, 60.8±17.7, 74.2±23.0, and 82.3±21.9, respectively, with P values below 0.001). There was no significantly statistical difference in the number of platelet aggregation of rats in group SI between each two time points within the same group (with P values above 0.05), but the number of platelet aggregation of rats in the other 3 groups at each time point post injury was significantly more than that of the same group at 15 min before injury (with P values below 0.001). (2) At 2, 4, and 8 h post injury, β-TG content of serum of rats in group SEB was significantly higher than that in group SI (with Z values from -3.780 to -3.477, P values below 0.05). At 5 min and 4 h post injury, β-TG content of serum of rats in group UTI was significantly lower than that in group NS (with Z values respectively -3.477 and -3.780, P values below 0.05). There was no significantly statistical difference in β-TG content of serum of rats in group SI at all time points of the same group (χ(2)=0.130, P >0.05). At 2, 4, and 8 h post injury, β-TG content of serum of rats in group SEB was significantly higher than that of the same group at 15 min before injury (with Z values from -3.780 to -3.553, P values below 0.05). At 5 min, 1 h, and 4 h post injury, β-TG content of serum of rats in group NS was significantly higher than that of the same group at 15 min before injury (with Z values from -3.780 to -3.477, P values below 0.05). At 1 and 4 h post injury, β-TG content of serum of rats in group UTI was significantly higher than that of the same group at 15 min before injury (with Z values respectively -3.250 and -3.780, P values below 0.05). (3) At 2 and 8 h post injury, PF-4 content of serum of rats in group SEB was significantly higher than that in group SI (with P values below 0.05). At 2 h post injury, PF-4 content of serum of rats in group UTI was significantly higher than that in group NS (P<0.05), and at 4 and 8 h post injury, PF-4 content of serum of rats in group UTI was significantly lower than that in group NS (with P values below 0.05). At all time points, PF-4 content of serum of rats in group SI was close (with P values above 0.05). At 2 and 8 h post injury, PF-4 content of serum of rats in group SEB was significantly higher than that of the same group at 15 min before injury (with P values below 0.05). At 1, 4, and 8 h post injury, PF-4 content of serum of rats in group NS was significantly higher than that of the same group at 15 min before injury (with P values below 0.05). There were significantly statistical differences in PF-4 content of serum of rats between all time points except for 5 min post injury and 15 min before injury (with P values below 0.05). Conclusions: Increasing number of platelet aggregation and abnormal secretion of β-TG and PF-4 of rats with high-voltage electrical burns can lead to microcirculation disturbance. UTI can alleviate microcirculation disturbance caused by high-voltage electrical burns by reducing the number of platelet aggregation and inhibiting secretion of β-TG and PF-4.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Burns, electric

Microcirculation

Platelet aggregation

Platelet factor 4

Ulinastatin

β-thromboglobulin

Journal Title zhonghua shao shang za zhi = zhonghua shaoshang zazhi = chinese journal of burns
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29275615
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180105
LR  - 20180105
IS  - 1009-2587 (Print)
IS  - 1009-2587 (Linking)
VI  - 33
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Dec 20
TI  - [Changes of platelet rheological behavior and the interventional effects of
      ulinastatin in rats with high-voltage electrical burns].
PG  - 744-749
LID - 10.3760/cma.j.issn.1009-2587.2017.12.005 [doi]
AB  - Objective: To explore the influence of high-voltage electrical burns on the
      number of platelet aggregation, beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) and platelet
      factor 4 (PF-4) and the interventional effects of ulinastatin in rats with
      high-voltage electrical burns. Methods: A total of 240 Sprague-Dawley rats were
      divided into sham injury (SI) group, simple electrical burn (SEB) group, normal
      saline (NS) group, and ulinastatin (UTI) group according to the random number
      table, with 60 rats in each group. The electrical current was applied to the
      outside proximal part of left forelimb of rats and exited from the outside
      proximal part of right hind limb of rats. Rats in groups SEB, NS, and UTI were
      inflicted with high-voltage electrical burn wounds of 1 cmx1 cm at current
      entrances and exits, with the voltage regulator and experimental transformer.
      Rats in group SI were sham injured through connecting the same equipments without
      electricity. At 2 min post injury, rats in group NS were intraperitoneally
      injected with 2 mL/kg NS, and rats in group UTI were intraperitoneally injected
      with 2x10(4) U/kg UTI of 10 g/L. At 15 min before injury and 5 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4
      h, 8 h post injury, 10 rats in each group were selected to collect 5-7 mL blood
      of heart respectively. Blood of 0.05 mL were collected to make fresh blood smear 
      for observing the number of platelet aggregation, and serum were separated from
      the remaining blood to determine content of beta-TG and PF-4 with enzyme-linked
      immunosorbent assay. Data were processed with analysis of factorial design of
      variance, student-Newman-Keuls test, Kruskal-Wallis H test, Wilcoxon rank sum
      test, and Bonferroni correction. Results: (1) At 15 min before injury, the
      numbers of platelet aggregation of rats were close among groups SI, SEB, NS and
      UTI (5.9+/-1.2, 5.8+/-1.2, 5.9+/-1.3, 5.9+/-1.1, respectively, with P values
      above 0.05). At 5 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h post injury, the numbers of platelet
      aggregation of rats in group SEB were 57.2+/-16.3, 59.1+/-16.9, 60.8+/-20.6,
      83.6+/-24.9, and 83.4+/-30.3, respectively, obviously more than those in group SI
      (6.0+/-1.3, 6.0+/-1.4, 5.9+/-1.4, 5.7+/-1.1, and 5.8+/-1.3, respectively, with P 
      values below 0.001); the numbers of platelet aggregation of rats in group UTI
      were 29.6+/-7.4, 31.9+/-10.1, 35.0+/-14.2, 43.0+/-13.6, and 35.2+/-11.1,
      respectively, obviously more than those in group NS (58.3+/-16.1, 63.9+/-18.0,
      60.8+/-17.7, 74.2+/-23.0, and 82.3+/-21.9, respectively, with P values below
      0.001). There was no significantly statistical difference in the number of
      platelet aggregation of rats in group SI between each two time points within the 
      same group (with P values above 0.05), but the number of platelet aggregation of 
      rats in the other 3 groups at each time point post injury was significantly more 
      than that of the same group at 15 min before injury (with P values below 0.001). 
      (2) At 2, 4, and 8 h post injury, beta-TG content of serum of rats in group SEB
      was significantly higher than that in group SI (with Z values from -3.780 to
      -3.477, P values below 0.05). At 5 min and 4 h post injury, beta-TG content of
      serum of rats in group UTI was significantly lower than that in group NS (with Z 
      values respectively -3.477 and -3.780, P values below 0.05). There was no
      significantly statistical difference in beta-TG content of serum of rats in group
      SI at all time points of the same group (chi(2)=0.130, P &gt;0.05). At 2, 4, and 8 h
      post injury, beta-TG content of serum of rats in group SEB was significantly
      higher than that of the same group at 15 min before injury (with Z values from
      -3.780 to -3.553, P values below 0.05). At 5 min, 1 h, and 4 h post injury,
      beta-TG content of serum of rats in group NS was significantly higher than that
      of the same group at 15 min before injury (with Z values from -3.780 to -3.477, P
      values below 0.05). At 1 and 4 h post injury, beta-TG content of serum of rats in
      group UTI was significantly higher than that of the same group at 15 min before
      injury (with Z values respectively -3.250 and -3.780, P values below 0.05). (3)
      At 2 and 8 h post injury, PF-4 content of serum of rats in group SEB was
      significantly higher than that in group SI (with P values below 0.05). At 2 h
      post injury, PF-4 content of serum of rats in group UTI was significantly higher 
      than that in group NS (P&lt;0.05), and at 4 and 8 h post injury, PF-4 content of
      serum of rats in group UTI was significantly lower than that in group NS (with P 
      values below 0.05). At all time points, PF-4 content of serum of rats in group SI
      was close (with P values above 0.05). At 2 and 8 h post injury, PF-4 content of
      serum of rats in group SEB was significantly higher than that of the same group
      at 15 min before injury (with P values below 0.05). At 1, 4, and 8 h post injury,
      PF-4 content of serum of rats in group NS was significantly higher than that of
      the same group at 15 min before injury (with P values below 0.05). There were
      significantly statistical differences in PF-4 content of serum of rats between
      all time points except for 5 min post injury and 15 min before injury (with P
      values below 0.05). Conclusions: Increasing number of platelet aggregation and
      abnormal secretion of beta-TG and PF-4 of rats with high-voltage electrical burns
      can lead to microcirculation disturbance. UTI can alleviate microcirculation
      disturbance caused by high-voltage electrical burns by reducing the number of
      platelet aggregation and inhibiting secretion of beta-TG and PF-4.
FAU - Zhang, Q F
AU  - Zhang QF
AD  - Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery, the First Hospital of Hebei Medical
      University, Burns Treatment Project Technology Research Center of Hebei Province,
      Shijiazhuang 050031, China.
FAU - Li, Y
AU  - Li Y
FAU - Feng, J K
AU  - Feng JK
FAU - Xu, Y F
AU  - Xu YF
FAU - Tu, L L
AU  - Tu LL
LA  - chi
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - China
TA  - Zhonghua Shao Shang Za Zhi
JT  - Zhonghua shao shang za zhi = Zhonghua shaoshang zazhi = Chinese journal of burns
JID - 100959418
RN  - 0 (Glycoproteins)
RN  - 0 (PPBP protein, human)
RN  - 0 (Trypsin Inhibitors)
RN  - 0 (beta-Thromboglobulin)
RN  - OR3S9IF86U (urinastatin)
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Blood Platelets/*drug effects
MH  - Burns
MH  - Burns, Electric/blood/*physiopathology
MH  - Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
MH  - Glycoproteins/*pharmacology
MH  - Microcirculation
MH  - Platelet Aggregation/*drug effects
MH  - Rats
MH  - Rats, Sprague-Dawley
MH  - Serum
MH  - Trypsin Inhibitors/*pharmacology
MH  - beta-Thromboglobulin
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Burns, electric
OT  - Microcirculation
OT  - Platelet aggregation
OT  - Platelet factor 4
OT  - Ulinastatin
OT  - beta-thromboglobulin
EDAT- 2017/12/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/06 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/26 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/06 06:00 [medline]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Zhonghua Shao Shang Za Zhi. 2017 Dec 20;33(12):744-749.