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Genetic variability of Taenia solium cysticerci recovered from experimentally infected pigs and from naturally infected pigs using microsatellite markers.

Abstract The adult Taenia solium, the pork tapeworm, usually lives as a single worm in the small intestine of humans, its only known definitive host. Mechanisms of genetic variation in T. solium are poorly understood. Using three microsatellite markers previously reported [1], this study explored the genetic variability of T. solium from cysts recovered from experimentally infected pigs. It then explored the genetic epidemiology and transmission in naturally infected pigs and adult tapeworms recovered from human carriers from an endemic rural community in Peru. In an initial study on experimental infection, two groups of three piglets were each infected with proglottids from one of two genetically different tapeworms for each of the microsatellites. After 7 weeks, pigs were slaughtered and necropsy performed. Thirty-six (92.3%) out of 39 cysts originated from one tapeworm, and 27 (100%) out of 27 cysts from the other had exactly the same genotype as the parental tapeworm. This suggests that the microsatellite markers may be a useful tool for studying the transmission of T. solium. In the second study, we analyzed the genetic variation of T. solium in cysts recovered from eight naturally infected pigs, and from adult tapeworms recovered from four human carriers; they showed genetic variability. Four pigs had cysts with only one genotype, and four pigs had cysts with two different genotypes, suggesting that multiple infections of genetically distinct parental tapeworms are possible. Six pigs harbored cysts with a genotype corresponding to one of the identified tapeworms from the human carriers. In the dendrogram, cysts appeared to cluster within the corresponding pigs as well as with the geographical origin, but this association was not statistically significant. We conclude that genotyping of microsatellite size polymorphisms is a potentially important tool to trace the spread of infection and pinpoint sources of infection as pigs spread cysts with a shared parental genotype.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos neglected tropical diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29284011
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
LR  - 20180114
IS  - 1935-2735 (Electronic)
IS  - 1935-2727 (Linking)
VI  - 11
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - Genetic variability of Taenia solium cysticerci recovered from experimentally
      infected pigs and from naturally infected pigs using microsatellite markers.
PG  - e0006087
LID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006087 [doi]
AB  - The adult Taenia solium, the pork tapeworm, usually lives as a single worm in the
      small intestine of humans, its only known definitive host. Mechanisms of genetic 
      variation in T. solium are poorly understood. Using three microsatellite markers 
      previously reported [1], this study explored the genetic variability of T. solium
      from cysts recovered from experimentally infected pigs. It then explored the
      genetic epidemiology and transmission in naturally infected pigs and adult
      tapeworms recovered from human carriers from an endemic rural community in Peru. 
      In an initial study on experimental infection, two groups of three piglets were
      each infected with proglottids from one of two genetically different tapeworms
      for each of the microsatellites. After 7 weeks, pigs were slaughtered and
      necropsy performed. Thirty-six (92.3%) out of 39 cysts originated from one
      tapeworm, and 27 (100%) out of 27 cysts from the other had exactly the same
      genotype as the parental tapeworm. This suggests that the microsatellite markers 
      may be a useful tool for studying the transmission of T. solium. In the second
      study, we analyzed the genetic variation of T. solium in cysts recovered from
      eight naturally infected pigs, and from adult tapeworms recovered from four human
      carriers; they showed genetic variability. Four pigs had cysts with only one
      genotype, and four pigs had cysts with two different genotypes, suggesting that
      multiple infections of genetically distinct parental tapeworms are possible. Six 
      pigs harbored cysts with a genotype corresponding to one of the identified
      tapeworms from the human carriers. In the dendrogram, cysts appeared to cluster
      within the corresponding pigs as well as with the geographical origin, but this
      association was not statistically significant. We conclude that genotyping of
      microsatellite size polymorphisms is a potentially important tool to trace the
      spread of infection and pinpoint sources of infection as pigs spread cysts with a
      shared parental genotype.
FAU - Pajuelo, Monica J
AU  - Pajuelo MJ
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-3662-2250
AD  - Laboratorio de Bioinformatica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias y
      Filosofia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
AD  - Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
      Health, Baltimore, United States of America.
FAU - Eguiluz, Maria
AU  - Eguiluz M
AD  - Laboratorio de Bioinformatica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias y
      Filosofia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
FAU - Roncal, Elisa
AU  - Roncal E
AD  - Laboratorio de Bioinformatica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias y
      Filosofia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
FAU - Quinones-Garcia, Stefany
AU  - Quinones-Garcia S
AD  - Laboratorio de Bioinformatica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias y
      Filosofia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
FAU - Clipman, Steven J
AU  - Clipman SJ
AD  - Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
      Health, Baltimore, United States of America.
FAU - Calcina, Juan
AU  - Calcina J
AD  - School of Veterinary Medicine, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima,
      Peru.
FAU - Gavidia, Cesar M
AU  - Gavidia CM
AD  - School of Veterinary Medicine, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima,
      Peru.
FAU - Sheen, Patricia
AU  - Sheen P
AD  - Laboratorio de Bioinformatica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias y
      Filosofia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
FAU - Garcia, Hector H
AU  - Garcia HH
AD  - Laboratorio de Bioinformatica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias y
      Filosofia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
AD  - Center for Global Health, Universidad, Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
AD  - Department of Microbiology, School of Science and Philosophy, Universidad Peruana
      Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
FAU - Gilman, Robert H
AU  - Gilman RH
AD  - Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
      Health, Baltimore, United States of America.
FAU - Gonzalez, Armando E
AU  - Gonzalez AE
AD  - School of Veterinary Medicine, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima,
      Peru.
FAU - Zimic, Mirko
AU  - Zimic M
AD  - Laboratorio de Bioinformatica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias y
      Filosofia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
CN  - Cysticercosis Working Group in Peru
LA  - eng
GR  - D43 TW001140/TW/FIC NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20171228
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis
JT  - PLoS neglected tropical diseases
JID - 101291488
PMC - PMC5746202
EDAT- 2017/12/29 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/29 06:00
PHST- 2017/05/17 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/10/31 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/12/29 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/29 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/29 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006087 [doi]
AID - PNTD-D-17-00760 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2017 Dec 28;11(12):e0006087. doi:
      10.1371/journal.pntd.0006087. eCollection 2017 Dec.