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Population-Based Surveillance of Birth Defects Potentially Related to Zika Virus Infection - 15 States and U.S. Territories, 2016.

Abstract Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects, including microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1). Population-based birth defects surveillance systems are critical to monitor all infants and fetuses with birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection, regardless of known exposure or laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy. CDC analyzed data from 15 U.S. jurisdictions conducting population-based surveillance for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection.* Jurisdictions were stratified into the following three groups: those with 1) documented local transmission of Zika virus during 2016; 2) one or more cases of confirmed, symptomatic, travel-associated Zika virus disease reported to CDC per 100,000 residents; and 3) less than one case of confirmed, symptomatic, travel-associated Zika virus disease reported to CDC per 100,000 residents. A total of 2,962 infants and fetuses (3.0 per 1,000 live births; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.9-3.2) (2) met the case definition.† In areas with local transmission there was a non-statistically significant increase in total birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection from 2.8 cases per 1,000 live births in the first half of 2016 to 3.0 cases in the second half (p = 0.10). However, when neural tube defects and other early brain malformations (NTDs)§ were excluded, the prevalence of birth defects strongly linked to congenital Zika virus infection increased significantly, from 2.0 cases per 1,000 live births in the first half of 2016 to 2.4 cases in the second half, an increase of 29 more cases than expected (p = 0.009). These findings underscore the importance of surveillance for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection and the need for continued monitoring in areas at risk for Zika.
PMID
Related Publications

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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Population Surveillance

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29370151
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180126
LR  - 20180126
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 67
IP  - 3
DP  - 2018 Jan 26
TI  - Population-Based Surveillance of Birth Defects Potentially Related to Zika Virus 
      Infection - 15 States and U.S. Territories, 2016.
PG  - 91-96
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6703a2 [doi]
AB  - Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects, including 
      microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1). Population-based birth defects
      surveillance systems are critical to monitor all infants and fetuses with birth
      defects potentially related to Zika virus infection, regardless of known exposure
      or laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy. CDC analyzed
      data from 15 U.S. jurisdictions conducting population-based surveillance for
      birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection.* Jurisdictions were
      stratified into the following three groups: those with 1) documented local
      transmission of Zika virus during 2016; 2) one or more cases of confirmed,
      symptomatic, travel-associated Zika virus disease reported to CDC per 100,000
      residents; and 3) less than one case of confirmed, symptomatic, travel-associated
      Zika virus disease reported to CDC per 100,000 residents. A total of 2,962
      infants and fetuses (3.0 per 1,000 live births; 95% confidence interval [CI] =
      2.9-3.2) (2) met the case definition.(dagger) In areas with local transmission
      there was a non-statistically significant increase in total birth defects
      potentially related to Zika virus infection from 2.8 cases per 1,000 live births 
      in the first half of 2016 to 3.0 cases in the second half (p = 0.10). However,
      when neural tube defects and other early brain malformations (NTDs)( section
      sign) were excluded, the prevalence of birth defects strongly linked to
      congenital Zika virus infection increased significantly, from 2.0 cases per 1,000
      live births in the first half of 2016 to 2.4 cases in the second half, an
      increase of 29 more cases than expected (p = 0.009). These findings underscore
      the importance of surveillance for birth defects potentially related to Zika
      virus infection and the need for continued monitoring in areas at risk for Zika.
FAU - Delaney, Augustina
AU  - Delaney A
FAU - Mai, Cara
AU  - Mai C
FAU - Smoots, Ashley
AU  - Smoots A
FAU - Cragan, Janet
AU  - Cragan J
FAU - Ellington, Sascha
AU  - Ellington S
FAU - Langlois, Peter
AU  - Langlois P
FAU - Breidenbach, Rebecca
AU  - Breidenbach R
FAU - Fornoff, Jane
AU  - Fornoff J
FAU - Dunn, Julie
AU  - Dunn J
FAU - Yazdy, Mahsa
AU  - Yazdy M
FAU - Scotto-Rosato, Nancy
AU  - Scotto-Rosato N
FAU - Sweatlock, Joseph
AU  - Sweatlock J
FAU - Fox, Deborah
AU  - Fox D
FAU - Palacios, Jessica
AU  - Palacios J
FAU - Forestieri, Nina
AU  - Forestieri N
FAU - Leedom, Vinita
AU  - Leedom V
FAU - Smiley, Mary
AU  - Smiley M
FAU - Nance, Amy
AU  - Nance A
FAU - Lake-Burger, Heather
AU  - Lake-Burger H
FAU - Romitti, Paul
AU  - Romitti P
FAU - Fall, Carrie
AU  - Fall C
FAU - Prado, Miguel Valencia
AU  - Prado MV
FAU - Barton, Jerusha
AU  - Barton J
FAU - Bryan, J Michael
AU  - Bryan JM
FAU - Arias, William
AU  - Arias W
FAU - Brown, Samara Viner
AU  - Brown SV
FAU - Kimura, Jonathan
AU  - Kimura J
FAU - Mann, Sylvia
AU  - Mann S
FAU - Martin, Brennan
AU  - Martin B
FAU - Orantes, Lucia
AU  - Orantes L
FAU - Taylor, Amber
AU  - Taylor A
FAU - Nahabedian, John
AU  - Nahabedian J
FAU - Akosa, Amanda
AU  - Akosa A
FAU - Song, Ziwei
AU  - Song Z
FAU - Martin, Stacey
AU  - Martin S
FAU - Ramlal, Roshan
AU  - Ramlal R
FAU - Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie
AU  - Shapiro-Mendoza C
FAU - Isenburg, Jennifer
AU  - Isenburg J
FAU - Moore, Cynthia A
AU  - Moore CA
FAU - Gilboa, Suzanne
AU  - Gilboa S
FAU - Honein, Margaret A
AU  - Honein MA
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20180126
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Congenital Abnormalities/*epidemiology/*virology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - *Population Surveillance
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Puerto Rico/epidemiology
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Zika Virus Infection/*complications
COIS- No conflicts of interest were reported.
EDAT- 2018/01/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/01/26 06:00
PHST- 2018/01/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/01/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6703a2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Jan 26;67(3):91-96. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6703a2.