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Associations between dental anxiety and postoperative pain following extraction of horizontally impacted wisdom teeth: A prospective observational study.

Abstract The aim of the study is to identify associations between dental anxiety and postoperative pain in patients undergoing extraction of horizontally impacted wisdom teeth.A total of 119 volunteers provided demographic data, and completed questionnaires, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Chinese Index of Dental Anxiety and Fear (C-IDAF)-4C, and the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain.Mean SAI, TAI, and C-IDAF-4C scores were 42.5 ± 8.7, 46.4 ± 10.9, and 16.9 ± 7.2, respectively. Mean postoperative pain level score was 3.0 ± 1.8 (range: 0.3-8.4). SAI scores increased as preoperative pain levels increased (β = 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-1.98, P < .001); females had higher SAI scores than males (5.34; 95% CI: 1.74-8.95, P = .004). Multivariable analysis revealed that females, bad exodontic experience, and higher predicted pain levels were associated with higher IDAF-4C scores. SAI scores (γ = 0.611, P < .001) and TAI scores (γ = 0.305, P < .001) increased as C-IDAF-4C scores increased. Higher C-IDAF-4C scores and longer operative time were significantly associated with higher levels of postoperative pain.Specific factors are associated with anxiety and stress, and postoperative pain in patients undergoing wisdom teeth extraction. Addressing these factors preoperatively may reduce stress and anxiety, and lead to more favorable treatment outcomes.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Dental Anxiety

Pain, Postoperative

Tooth Extraction

Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29381942
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180208
LR  - 20180208
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 47
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Associations between dental anxiety and postoperative pain following extraction
      of horizontally impacted wisdom teeth: A prospective observational study.
PG  - e8665
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000008665 [doi]
AB  - The aim of the study is to identify associations between dental anxiety and
      postoperative pain in patients undergoing extraction of horizontally impacted
      wisdom teeth.A total of 119 volunteers provided demographic data, and completed
      questionnaires, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Chinese Index of Dental
      Anxiety and Fear (C-IDAF)-4C, and the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain.Mean
      SAI, TAI, and C-IDAF-4C scores were 42.5 +/- 8.7, 46.4 +/- 10.9, and 16.9 +/-
      7.2, respectively. Mean postoperative pain level score was 3.0 +/- 1.8 (range:
      0.3-8.4). SAI scores increased as preoperative pain levels increased (beta =
      1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-1.98, P &lt; .001); females had higher SAI 
      scores than males (5.34; 95% CI: 1.74-8.95, P = .004). Multivariable analysis
      revealed that females, bad exodontic experience, and higher predicted pain levels
      were associated with higher IDAF-4C scores. SAI scores (gamma = 0.611, P &lt; .001) 
      and TAI scores (gamma = 0.305, P &lt; .001) increased as C-IDAF-4C scores increased.
      Higher C-IDAF-4C scores and longer operative time were significantly associated
      with higher levels of postoperative pain.Specific factors are associated with
      anxiety and stress, and postoperative pain in patients undergoing wisdom teeth
      extraction. Addressing these factors preoperatively may reduce stress and
      anxiety, and lead to more favorable treatment outcomes.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All
      rights reserved.
FAU - Wang, Tze-Fang
AU  - Wang TF
AD  - School of Nursing, National Yang Ming University.
FAU - Wu, Ya-Ting
AU  - Wu YT
AD  - School of Nursing, National Yang Ming University.
FAU - Tseng, Chien-Fu
AU  - Tseng CF
AD  - Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, School of dentistry, National Taiwan
      University.
FAU - Chou, Chyuan
AU  - Chou C
AD  - Excellent Dental Center, Taipei, Taiwan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Observational Study
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - *Dental Anxiety/diagnosis/physiopathology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
MH  - Pain Measurement/methods
MH  - *Pain, Postoperative/diagnosis/psychology
MH  - Perioperative Period/psychology
MH  - Statistics as Topic
MH  - Taiwan/epidemiology
MH  - Test Anxiety Scale
MH  - *Tooth Extraction/adverse effects/psychology
MH  - Tooth, Impacted/epidemiology/*surgery
PMC - PMC5708941
EDAT- 2018/02/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/09 06:00
CRDT- 2018/02/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/09 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000008665 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201711270-00033 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Nov;96(47):e8665. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000008665.