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The prevalence, metabolic risk and effects of lifestyle intervention for metabolically healthy obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis: A PRISMA-compliant article.

Abstract We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to firstly obtain a reliable estimation of the prevalence of metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals in obesity, then assessed the risk of developing metabolic abnormalities (MA) among MHO individuals. At last, we evaluated the effects of traditional lifestyle interventions on metabolic level for MHO subjects.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Risk Reduction Behavior

Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29381992
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180209
LR  - 20180209
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 47
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - The prevalence, metabolic risk and effects of lifestyle intervention for
      metabolically healthy obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis: A
      PRISMA-compliant article.
PG  - e8838
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000008838 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to firstly obtain 
      a reliable estimation of the prevalence of metabolically healthy obese (MHO)
      individuals in obesity, then assessed the risk of developing metabolic
      abnormalities (MA) among MHO individuals. At last, we evaluated the effects of
      traditional lifestyle interventions on metabolic level for MHO subjects. METHODS:
      A systematic review and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guideline were conducted, and
      original studies were searched up to December 31, 2016. The prevalence of MHO in 
      obesity from each study was pooled using random effects models. The relative
      risks (RRs) were pooled to determine the risk of developing MA for MHO compared
      with metabolically healthy normal-weight (MHNW) subjects. For the meta-analysis
      of intervention studies, the mean difference and standardized mean differences
      were both estimated for each metabolic parameter within each study, and then
      pooled using a random-effects model. RESULTS: Overall, 40 population-based
      studies reported the prevalence of MHO in obesity, 12 cohort studies and 7
      intervention studies were included in the meta-analysis. About 35.0% obese
      individuals were metabolically healthy in the obese subjects. There were dramatic
      differences in the prevalence among different areas. However, 0.49 (95%
      confidence intervals [CI]: 0.38 to 0.60) of the MHO individuals would develop one
      or more MA within 10 years. Compared with MHNW subjects, the MHO subjects
      presented higher risk of incident MA (pooled RR = 1.80, 95%CI: 1.53-2.11).
      Following intervention, there was certain and significant improvement of
      metabolic state for metabolically abnormal obesity (MAO) subjects. Only diastolic
      blood pressure had reduced for MHO individuals after intervention. CONCLUSIONS:
      Almost one-third of the obese individuals are in metabolic health. However, they 
      are still at higher risk of advancing to unhealthy state. Therefore, it is still 
      needed to advise MHO individuals to maintain or adopt a healthy lifestyle, so as 
      to counterbalance the adverse effects of obesity.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All
      rights reserved.
FAU - Lin, Hanli
AU  - Lin H
AD  - Department of Cardiology.
FAU - Zhang, Liqun
AU  - Zhang L
AD  - Department of Intensive Care Unit, Zhejiang Putuo Hospital, Zhoushan.
FAU - Zheng, Ruizhi
AU  - Zheng R
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Statistic, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou,
      Zhejiang.
FAU - Zheng, Yishan
AU  - Zheng Y
AD  - Department of Intensive Care Unit, The Second Hospital of Nanjing. Teaching
      Hospital of Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Meta-Analysis
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Life Style
MH  - Male
MH  - Metabolic Diseases/*etiology
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Obesity Management/*methods
MH  - Obesity, Metabolically Benign/complications/*epidemiology/*therapy
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Risk Assessment
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - *Risk Reduction Behavior
MH  - Treatment Outcome
PMC - PMC5708991
EDAT- 2018/02/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/10 06:00
CRDT- 2018/02/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/10 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000008838 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201711270-00083 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Nov;96(47):e8838. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000008838.