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Acute superior mesenteric vein thrombosis associated with abdominal trauma: A rare case report and literature review.

Abstract Acute mesenteric vein thrombosis (MVT) is defined as new-onset thrombosis of the mesenteric vein without evidence of collateralization, finally resulting in extensive intestinal infarction. MVT may be idiopathic or be caused by conditions responsible for thrombophilia and acquired risk factors. To date, there have been few reports of MVT after trauma. Herein we describe our experiences treating three patients with MVT.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29382004
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180209
LR  - 20180209
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 47
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Acute superior mesenteric vein thrombosis associated with abdominal trauma: A
      rare case report and literature review.
PG  - e8863
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000008863 [doi]
AB  - RATIONALE: Acute mesenteric vein thrombosis (MVT) is defined as new-onset
      thrombosis of the mesenteric vein without evidence of collateralization, finally 
      resulting in extensive intestinal infarction. MVT may be idiopathic or be caused 
      by conditions responsible for thrombophilia and acquired risk factors. To date,
      there have been few reports of MVT after trauma. Herein we describe our
      experiences treating three patients with MVT. PATIENT CONCERNS: Case 1 was a
      44-year-old man with transverse colon mesenteric hematoma after blunt abdominal
      trauma. Case 2 was a 55-year-old man with jejunal transection after a traffic
      accident. Case 3 was a 26-year-old man presented with multiple abdominal stab
      bowel injury. DIAGNOSES: A 1-week follow-up abdominal computed tomography scan
      showed superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in all of three patients.
      INTERVENTIONS: All patients were treated with anticoagulant for 3 or 6 months.
      OUTCOMES: MVTs were completely resolved without any complications. LESSONS: If
      early diagnosis and treatment could be available, anticoagulation alone might be 
      adequate for the treatment of SMVT associated with trauma. Early anticoagulation 
      in patients with acute SMVT may avoid the grave prognosis observed in patients
      with arterial thrombosis.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All
      rights reserved.
FAU - Lim, Kyoung Hoon
AU  - Lim KH
AD  - Department of Surgery, Trauma Center, Kyungpook National University Hospital,
      School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea.
FAU - Jang, Jihoon
AU  - Jang J
FAU - Yoon, Hye Young
AU  - Yoon HY
FAU - Park, Jinyoung
AU  - Park J
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Abdominal Injuries/*complications
MH  - Acute Disease
MH  - Adult
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion/drug therapy/*etiology
MH  - Mesenteric Veins
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy/*etiology
MH  - Wounds, Nonpenetrating/*complications
PMC - PMC5709003
EDAT- 2018/02/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/10 06:00
CRDT- 2018/02/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/10 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000008863 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201711270-00095 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Nov;96(47):e8863. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000008863.