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Clinical significance of measuring reticulated platelets in infectious diseases.

Abstract This study aimed to explore the association between the percentage of reticulated platelets (RP%) and infection, and analyze the value of combined measurement of RP% with other inflammatory indicators in diagnosing infection. A total of 190 patients with signs and symptoms suspicious of infection were included in the infection group, and 70 healthy subjects with comparable percentages of gender and age were included in the control group. Peripheral white blood cell (WBC) count, percentage of neutrophils (N%), platelet count, C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), RP%, and axillary temperature were recorded. Dynamic changes in RP% with infection were measured to analyze the association between RP% and infection. The receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the value of each inflammatory indicator in diagnosing infection and analyze the diagnostic value of the combined adoption of multiple inflammatory indicators. RP% was significantly higher in the infection group than in the noninfection and control groups. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing infection were, respectively, 91.78% and 93.18% when RP% and CRP were used in combination, 90.41% and 90.90% when RP% and PCT were used in combination, and 100% and 100% when RP%, CRP, and PCT were used in combination. RP% changed dynamically with the progression of infection and recovered to lower than 5.5% at 2 to 7 days before the body temperature recovered to a normal level. The diagnostic value of RP% was the highest. A combined use with CRP/PCT could improve the sensitivity and specificity in the early diagnosis of infectious diseases.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Platelet Count

Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29384919
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180209
LR  - 20180209
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 52
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - Clinical significance of measuring reticulated platelets in infectious diseases.
PG  - e9424
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000009424 [doi]
AB  - This study aimed to explore the association between the percentage of reticulated
      platelets (RP%) and infection, and analyze the value of combined measurement of
      RP% with other inflammatory indicators in diagnosing infection. A total of 190
      patients with signs and symptoms suspicious of infection were included in the
      infection group, and 70 healthy subjects with comparable percentages of gender
      and age were included in the control group. Peripheral white blood cell (WBC)
      count, percentage of neutrophils (N%), platelet count, C-reactive protein (CRP), 
      procalcitonin (PCT), RP%, and axillary temperature were recorded. Dynamic changes
      in RP% with infection were measured to analyze the association between RP% and
      infection. The receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the
      value of each inflammatory indicator in diagnosing infection and analyze the
      diagnostic value of the combined adoption of multiple inflammatory indicators.
      RP% was significantly higher in the infection group than in the noninfection and 
      control groups. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing infection were,
      respectively, 91.78% and 93.18% when RP% and CRP were used in combination, 90.41%
      and 90.90% when RP% and PCT were used in combination, and 100% and 100% when RP%,
      CRP, and PCT were used in combination. RP% changed dynamically with the
      progression of infection and recovered to lower than 5.5% at 2 to 7 days before
      the body temperature recovered to a normal level. The diagnostic value of RP% was
      the highest. A combined use with CRP/PCT could improve the sensitivity and
      specificity in the early diagnosis of infectious diseases.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All
      rights reserved.
FAU - Liu, Qin-Hua
AU  - Liu QH
AD  - Department of Hematology.
FAU - Song, Ming-Yue
AU  - Song MY
AD  - Department of Hematology.
FAU - Yang, Bai-Xia
AU  - Yang BX
AD  - Department of Laboratory, the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical
      University, Hefei, Anhui, China.
FAU - Xia, Rui-Xiang
AU  - Xia RX
AD  - Department of Hematology.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Observational Study
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
RN  - 0 (Biomarkers)
RN  - 9007-12-9 (Calcitonin)
RN  - 9007-41-4 (C-Reactive Protein)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Biomarkers/blood
MH  - Body Temperature
MH  - C-Reactive Protein/metabolism
MH  - Calcitonin/blood
MH  - Case-Control Studies
MH  - Communicable Diseases/*blood/*diagnosis
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Platelet Count
MH  - Sensitivity and Specificity
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2018/02/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/10 06:00
CRDT- 2018/02/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/02/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/10 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000009424 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201712290-00027 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Dec;96(52):e9424. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000009424.