PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Gastrointestinal perforation secondary to accidental ingestion of toothpicks: A series case report.

Abstract Toothpicks are widely used as a tooth cleaning tool after meals in China. Most of the Chinese toothpicks are made of wood or bamboo with a hard texture and sharp ends. This characteristic has proven to be potentially dangerous when toothpicks are accidentally ingested, as they can cause damage and perforation of the digestive tract and other subsequent complications.
PMID
Related Publications

Accidentally ingested toothpicks causing severe gastrointestinal injury: a practical guideline for diagnosis and therapy based on 136 case reports.

Intestinal perforation due to an ingested foreign body: laparoscopic management.

Sonographic detection of clinically unsuspected swallowed toothpicks and their gastrointestinal complications.

Successful diagnosis and treatment of ingested wooden toothpicks: Two case reports.

Toothpick injury mimicking renal colic: case report and systematic review.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Wood

Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29390302
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180212
LR  - 20180212
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 50
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - Gastrointestinal perforation secondary to accidental ingestion of toothpicks: A
      series case report.
PG  - e9066
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000009066 [doi]
AB  - RATIONALE: Toothpicks are widely used as a tooth cleaning tool after meals in
      China. Most of the Chinese toothpicks are made of wood or bamboo with a hard
      texture and sharp ends. This characteristic has proven to be potentially
      dangerous when toothpicks are accidentally ingested, as they can cause damage and
      perforation of the digestive tract and other subsequent complications. PATIENT
      CONCERNS: The main clinical complaints of 5 patients in this study were mainly
      acute or chronic abdominal pain, duration from 2 days to 2 months, 1 case with
      vomiting, 1 case with fever. DIAGNOSES: Four cases were initially diagnosed by
      computed tomography (CT) scan; However, the first case was misdiagnosed as
      appendicitis so the patient did not undertake a preoperative CT scan and it was
      diagnosed by laparoscopy. INTERVENTIONS: All the cases were treated by
      laparoscopy and the toothpicks were removed successfully. OUTCOMES:
      Toothpick-caused digestive perforation was confirmed by laparoscopy in all this 5
      cases, the perforation sites were 2 cases at the antrum of stomach, 1 case at the
      third part of duodenum, 1 case at the ileocecal junction and 1 case at the
      sigmoid colon. 4 cases had perforation repair . Operative time :48-67 min.
      Intraoperative bleeding: 25-80 ml. 1 patient had a secondary liver injury. No
      postoperative complications occurred in all cases. The length of hospital stay
      was between 4-25 days. LESSONS: Our case series study suggests that laparoscopy
      is a safe and feasible surgical procedure for definitive management of digestive 
      tract perforation by toothpick ingestion. We also suggest all the people should
      have healthy life behaviors and use the toothpicks correctly.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All
      rights reserved.
FAU - Yang, Zifeng
AU  - Yang Z
AD  - Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou,
      China.
FAU - Wu, Deqing
AU  - Wu D
FAU - Xiong, Dailan
AU  - Xiong D
FAU - Li, Yong
AU  - Li Y
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Accidents
MH  - Adult
MH  - China
MH  - Female
MH  - Foreign Bodies/*complications/*diagnostic imaging/surgery
MH  - Humans
MH  - Intestinal Perforation/*diagnostic imaging/*etiology/surgery
MH  - Male
MH  - Tomography, X-Ray Computed
MH  - *Wood
EDAT- 2018/02/03 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/13 06:00
CRDT- 2018/02/03 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/03 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/02/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/13 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000009066 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201712150-00052 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Dec;96(50):e9066. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000009066.