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Association between metabolic syndrome and bone fracture risk: A community-based study using a fracture risk assessment tool.

Abstract Osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome (MS) share similar risk factors. Previous studies of association between bone marrow density (BMD) and MS are controversial. Moreover, some studies revealed that MS is associated with BMD but not with bone fracture. In clinical practice, patients pay more attention to bone fracture risk than BMD values. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the association between MS and the 10-year bone fracture risk probability using a fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) from community-based data. From March 2014 to August 2015, 2689 participants (897 men and 1792 women) were enrolled in this study. Inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and C-reactive protein, and adipokines were included for analysis.The mean age was 60.2 ± 10.7 years in men and 58.9 ± 9.6 years in women. The percentage of MS was 27.6% in men and 27.9% in women. Participants were divided into 2 groups, those with or without MS. Compared with women without MS, women with MS had a higher rate of fracture risk (22.8% vs 16.3%, P = .001). In contrast, men with MS had a lower rate of fracture risk then men without MS (5.6% vs 12.3%, P = .004). However, MS loss the association with a high bone fracture risk in men based on multivariate logistical regression analysis, after adjusting for confounding factor of body mass index (BMI). Conclusively, the result of regression analysis between MS and the bone fracture risk may be different in men and women, and BMI was an important confounding factor to interfere with the regression analysis.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29390327
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180213
LR  - 20180213
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 50
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - Association between metabolic syndrome and bone fracture risk: A community-based 
      study using a fracture risk assessment tool.
PG  - e9180
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000009180 [doi]
AB  - Osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome (MS) share similar risk factors. Previous
      studies of association between bone marrow density (BMD) and MS are
      controversial. Moreover, some studies revealed that MS is associated with BMD but
      not with bone fracture. In clinical practice, patients pay more attention to bone
      fracture risk than BMD values. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the
      association between MS and the 10-year bone fracture risk probability using a
      fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) from community-based data. From March 2014
      to August 2015, 2689 participants (897 men and 1792 women) were enrolled in this 
      study. Inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and C-reactive
      protein, and adipokines were included for analysis.The mean age was 60.2 +/- 10.7
      years in men and 58.9 +/- 9.6 years in women. The percentage of MS was 27.6% in
      men and 27.9% in women. Participants were divided into 2 groups, those with or
      without MS. Compared with women without MS, women with MS had a higher rate of
      fracture risk (22.8% vs 16.3%, P = .001). In contrast, men with MS had a lower
      rate of fracture risk then men without MS (5.6% vs 12.3%, P = .004). However, MS 
      loss the association with a high bone fracture risk in men based on multivariate 
      logistical regression analysis, after adjusting for confounding factor of body
      mass index (BMI). Conclusively, the result of regression analysis between MS and 
      the bone fracture risk may be different in men and women, and BMI was an
      important confounding factor to interfere with the regression analysis.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All
      rights reserved.
FAU - Yu, Chia-Ying
AU  - Yu CY
AD  - Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
AD  - Community Medicine Research Center.
FAU - Chen, Fang-Ping
AU  - Chen FP
AD  - Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
FAU - Chen, Li-Wei
AU  - Chen LW
AD  - Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
AD  - Community Medicine Research Center.
FAU - Kuo, Sheng-Fong
AU  - Kuo SF
AD  - Community Medicine Research Center.
AD  - Metabolism and Endocrinology, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital and University,
      Keelung, Taiwan.
FAU - Chien, Rong-Nan
AU  - Chien RN
AD  - Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
AD  - Community Medicine Research Center.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
RN  - 0 (Biomarkers)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Biomarkers/blood
MH  - Bone Density
MH  - Female
MH  - Fractures, Bone/*etiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Metabolic Syndrome/*complications
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Risk Assessment
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Taiwan
EDAT- 2018/02/03 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/02/03 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/03 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/02/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000009180 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201712150-00077 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Dec;96(50):e9180. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000009180.