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Children’s Exposure to Secondhand Smoke, Parental Nicotine Dependence, and Motivation to Quit Smoking.

Abstract More than 600,000 people die each year as a result of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS); 28% of those deaths are children. Most exposure for children occurs in the home and is due to a parent smoking. Parental awareness and understanding of the exposure to SHS and the risk that parental smoking brings to the child may be an effective impetus for smoke avoidance and parental tobacco cessation. This descriptive, correlational study used data provided by a convenience sample of 184 smoking parental-figures, representing 376 children, recruited in community settings. Seven research questions were posed regarding the exposure of children to parental figures who smoke, the degree of the parents’ dependence on nicotine, and their level of motivation to stop smoking. Comparisons were made between income levels and ethnic/racial groups. Children’s exposure to SHS was low; Asian children had the highest likelihood of exposure. The areas of most frequent exposure were multiunit residential communities and in a vehicle. Parents’ dependence on nicotine was moderately high, and parental motivation to quit smoking was high. However, parents who were the most dependent on nicotine were the least motivated to quit. Nurses working with both adult and pediatric populations should address the opportunities for exposure to SHS for their patient population. Community health nurses should specifically target workplaces, businesses, and communities with high numbers of Asian residents for public health education related to childhood exposure to SHS.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Motivation

Keywords
Journal Title pediatric nursing
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29406665
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180301
LR  - 20180301
IS  - 0097-9805 (Print)
IS  - 0097-9805 (Linking)
VI  - 43
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Jan-Feb
TI  - Children's Exposure to Secondhand Smoke, Parental Nicotine Dependence, and
      Motivation to Quit Smoking.
PG  - 35-9
AB  - More than 600,000 people die each year as a result of exposure to secondhand
      smoke (SHS); 28% of those deaths are children. Most exposure for children occurs 
      in the home and is due to a parent smoking. Parental awareness and understanding 
      of the exposure to SHS and the risk that parental smoking brings to the child may
      be an effective impetus for smoke avoidance and parental tobacco cessation. This 
      descriptive, correlational study used data provided by a convenience sample of
      184 smoking parental-figures, representing 376 children, recruited in community
      settings. Seven research questions were posed regarding the exposure of children 
      to parental figures who smoke, the degree of the parents' dependence on nicotine,
      and their level of motivation to stop smoking. Comparisons were made between
      income levels and ethnic/racial groups. Children's exposure to SHS was low; Asian
      children had the highest likelihood of exposure. The areas of most frequent
      exposure were multiunit residential communities and in a vehicle. Parents'
      dependence on nicotine was moderately high, and parental motivation to quit
      smoking was high. However, parents who were the most dependent on nicotine were
      the least motivated to quit. Nurses working with both adult and pediatric
      populations should address the opportunities for exposure to SHS for their
      patient population. Community health nurses should specifically target
      workplaces, businesses, and communities with high numbers of Asian residents for 
      public health education related to childhood exposure to SHS.
FAU - Kleier, Jo Ann
AU  - Kleier JA
FAU - Mites-Campbell, Mary
AU  - Mites-Campbell M
FAU - Henson-Evertz, Kelly
AU  - Henson-Evertz K
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Pediatr Nurs
JT  - Pediatric nursing
JID - 7505804
RN  - 0 (Tobacco Smoke Pollution)
RN  - 6M3C89ZY6R (Nicotine)
SB  - N
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Air Pollution, Indoor/*adverse effects
MH  - Asthma/*etiology
MH  - Child
MH  - Environmental Exposure/*adverse effects
MH  - Female
MH  - Florida
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Motivation
MH  - Nicotine/adverse effects
MH  - Parents/*psychology
MH  - Smoking Cessation/*psychology
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Tobacco Smoke Pollution/*adverse effects
MH  - Tobacco Use Disorder/*prevention & control
EDAT- 2018/02/07 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/02/07 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/02/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/02 06:00 [medline]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Pediatr Nurs. 2017 Jan-Feb;43(1):35-9.