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Vital Signs: Asthma in Children - United States, 2001-2016.

Abstract Asthma is the most common chronic lung disease of childhood, affecting approximately 6 million children in the United States. Although asthma cannot be cured, most of the time, asthma symptoms can be controlled by avoiding or reducing exposure to asthma triggers (allergens and irritants) and by following recommendations for asthma education and appropriate medical care.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29420459
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180213
LR  - 20180213
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 67
IP  - 5
DP  - 2018 Feb 9
TI  - Vital Signs: Asthma in Children - United States, 2001-2016.
PG  - 149-155
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6705e1 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Asthma is the most common chronic lung disease of childhood,
      affecting approximately 6 million children in the United States. Although asthma 
      cannot be cured, most of the time, asthma symptoms can be controlled by avoiding 
      or reducing exposure to asthma triggers (allergens and irritants) and by
      following recommendations for asthma education and appropriate medical care.
      METHODS: CDC analyzed asthma data from the 2001-2016 National Health Interview
      Survey for children aged 0-17 years to examine trends and demographic differences
      in health outcomes and health care use. RESULTS: Asthma was more prevalent among 
      boys (9.2%) than among girls (7.4%), children aged >/=5 years (approximately 10%)
      than children aged <5 years (3.8%), non-Hispanic black (black) children (15.7%)
      and children of Puerto Rican descent (12.9%) than among non-Hispanic white
      (white) children (7.1%), and children living in low income families (10.5%) than 
      among those living in families with income >/=250% of the Federal Poverty Level
      (FPL) (approximately 7%). Asthma prevalence among children increased from 8.7% in
      2001 to 9.4% in 2010, and then decreased to 8.3% in 2016. Although not all
      changes were statistically significant, a similar pattern was observed among
      subdemographic groups studied, with the exception of Mexican/Mexican-American
      children, among whom asthma prevalence increased from 5.1% in 2001 to 6.5% in
      2016. Among children with asthma, the percentage who had an asthma attack in the 
      past 12 months declined significantly from 2001 to 2016. Whereas asthma
      prevalence was lower among children aged 0-4 years than among older children, the
      prevalence of asthma attacks (62.4%), emergency department or urgent care center 
      (ED/UC) visits (31.1%), and hospitalization (10.4%) were higher among children
      with asthma aged 0-4 years than among those aged 12-17 years (44.8%, 9.6%, and
      2.8%, respectively). During 2013, children with asthma aged 5-17 years missed
      13.8 million days of school per year (2.6 days per child). Compared with 2003, in
      2013, the prevalence of adverse health outcomes and health care use were
      significantly lower and the prevalence of having an action plan to manage asthma 
      was higher. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE: Asthma
      remains an important public health and medical problem. The health of children
      with asthma can be improved by promoting asthma control strategies, including
      asthma trigger reduction, appropriate guidelines-based medical management, and
      asthma education for children, parents, and others involved in asthma care.
FAU - Zahran, Hatice S
AU  - Zahran HS
FAU - Bailey, Cathy M
AU  - Bailey CM
FAU - Damon, Scott A
AU  - Damon SA
FAU - Garbe, Paul L
AU  - Garbe PL
FAU - Breysse, Patrick N
AU  - Breysse PN
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20180209
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Asthma/*epidemiology
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Female
MH  - Health Surveys
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Male
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - United States/epidemiology
COIS- No conflicts of interest were reported.
EDAT- 2018/02/09 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/02/09 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/09 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/02/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6705e1 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Feb 9;67(5):149-155. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6705e1.