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Encephalopathy associated with propofol infusion syndrome: A case report.

Abstract Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of propofol infusion. It is clinically characterized by metabolic acidosis, refractory bradycardia, rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, hyperlipidemia, and hepatomegaly. Brain lesion was only reported once in a pediatric patient. We present the 1st adult case with colon polyp and cancer who was diagnosed with PRIS. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans reveal prominent bilateral brain lesions, matching with the proposed pathophysiologic mechanism of the syndrome. The patient received prompt acidosis correction and cardiorespiratory support. At last, she died from refractory circulatory failure.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29505526
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180309
LR  - 20180309
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 1
DP  - 2018 Jan
TI  - Encephalopathy associated with propofol infusion syndrome: A case report.
PG  - e9521
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000009521 [doi]
AB  - INTRODUCTION: Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS) is a rare but potentially fatal
      complication of propofol infusion. It is clinically characterized by metabolic
      acidosis, refractory bradycardia, rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, hyperlipidemia, 
      and hepatomegaly. Brain lesion was only reported once in a pediatric patient. We 
      present the 1st adult case with colon polyp and cancer who was diagnosed with
      PRIS. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)
      scans reveal prominent bilateral brain lesions, matching with the proposed
      pathophysiologic mechanism of the syndrome. The patient received prompt acidosis 
      correction and cardiorespiratory support. At last, she died from refractory
      circulatory failure. CONCLUSION: It may be necessary to order a prompt
      neuroimaging examination in patients suspected with PRIS to judge whether brain
      lesions exist or not.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All
      rights reserved.
FAU - Li, Xiaolin
AU  - Li X
AD  - Department of Critical Care Medicine.
FAU - Zhao, Zhangning
AU  - Zhao Z
AD  - Department of Neurology, Affiliated Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University,
      Jinan, Shandong, China.
FAU - Liu, Xiaomin
AU  - Liu X
AD  - Department of Neurology, Affiliated Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University,
      Jinan, Shandong, China.
FAU - Ma, Gaoting
AU  - Ma G
AD  - Department of Neurology, Affiliated Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University,
      Jinan, Shandong, China.
FAU - Zhu, Mei-Jia
AU  - Zhu MJ
AD  - Department of Neurology, Affiliated Qianfoshan Hospital of Shandong University,
      Jinan, Shandong, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging/*etiology
MH  - Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
MH  - Fatal Outcome
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Neuroimaging
MH  - Propofol Infusion Syndrome/*complications
EDAT- 2018/03/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/10 06:00
CRDT- 2018/03/06 06:00
PHST- 2018/03/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/03/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/10 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000009521 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201801050-00023 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Jan;97(1):e9521. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000009521.