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Dental Personnel Treated for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis at a Tertiary Care Center - Virginia, 2000-2015.

Abstract In April 2016, a Virginia dentist who had recently received a diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and was undergoing treatment at a specialty clinic at a Virginia tertiary care center contacted CDC to report concerns that IPF had been diagnosed in multiple Virginia dentists who had sought treatment at the same specialty clinic. IPF is a chronic, progressive lung disease of unknown cause and associated with a poor prognosis (1). Although IPF has been associated with certain occupations (2), no published data exist regarding IPF in dentists. The medical records for all 894 patients treated for IPF at the Virginia tertiary care center during September 1996-June 2017 were reviewed for evidence that the patient had worked as a dentist, dental hygienist, or dental technician; among these patients, eight (0.9%) were identified as dentists and one (0.1%) as a dental technician, and each had sought treatment during 2000-2015. Seven of these nine patients had died. A questionnaire was administered to one of the living patients, who reported polishing dental appliances and preparing amalgams and impressions without respiratory protection. Substances used during these tasks contained silica, polyvinyl siloxane, alginate, and other compounds with known or potential respiratory toxicity. Although no clear etiologies for this cluster exist, occupational exposures possibly contributed. This cluster of IPF cases reinforces the need to understand further the unique occupational exposures of dental personnel and the association between these exposures and the risk for developing IPF so that appropriate strategies can be developed for the prevention of potentially harmful exposures.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Dental Staff

Dentists

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29518070
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180312
LR  - 20180312
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 67
IP  - 9
DP  - 2018 Mar 9
TI  - Dental Personnel Treated for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis at a Tertiary Care
      Center - Virginia, 2000-2015.
PG  - 270-273
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6709a2 [doi]
AB  - In April 2016, a Virginia dentist who had recently received a diagnosis of
      idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and was undergoing treatment at a specialty
      clinic at a Virginia tertiary care center contacted CDC to report concerns that
      IPF had been diagnosed in multiple Virginia dentists who had sought treatment at 
      the same specialty clinic. IPF is a chronic, progressive lung disease of unknown 
      cause and associated with a poor prognosis (1). Although IPF has been associated 
      with certain occupations (2), no published data exist regarding IPF in dentists. 
      The medical records for all 894 patients treated for IPF at the Virginia tertiary
      care center during September 1996-June 2017 were reviewed for evidence that the
      patient had worked as a dentist, dental hygienist, or dental technician; among
      these patients, eight (0.9%) were identified as dentists and one (0.1%) as a
      dental technician, and each had sought treatment during 2000-2015. Seven of these
      nine patients had died. A questionnaire was administered to one of the living
      patients, who reported polishing dental appliances and preparing amalgams and
      impressions without respiratory protection. Substances used during these tasks
      contained silica, polyvinyl siloxane, alginate, and other compounds with known or
      potential respiratory toxicity. Although no clear etiologies for this cluster
      exist, occupational exposures possibly contributed. This cluster of IPF cases
      reinforces the need to understand further the unique occupational exposures of
      dental personnel and the association between these exposures and the risk for
      developing IPF so that appropriate strategies can be developed for the prevention
      of potentially harmful exposures.
FAU - Nett, Randall J
AU  - Nett RJ
FAU - Cummings, Kristin J
AU  - Cummings KJ
FAU - Cannon, Brenna
AU  - Cannon B
FAU - Cox-Ganser, Jean
AU  - Cox-Ganser J
FAU - Nathan, Steven D
AU  - Nathan SD
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20180309
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Cluster Analysis
MH  - *Dental Staff/statistics & numerical data
MH  - *Dentists/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Humans
MH  - Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology/*therapy
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Occupational Diseases/etiology/*therapy
MH  - Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects
MH  - Tertiary Care Centers
MH  - Virginia
COIS- No conflicts of interest were reported.
EDAT- 2018/03/09 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/13 06:00
CRDT- 2018/03/09 06:00
PHST- 2018/03/09 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/03/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/13 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6709a2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Mar 9;67(9):270-273. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6709a2.