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Validity of maternal report of care-seeking for childhood illness.

Abstract Accurate data on care-seeking for child illness are needed to improve public health programs and reduce child mortality. The accuracy of maternal report of care-seeking for child illness as collected through household surveys has not been validated.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Health Care Surveys

Keywords
Journal Title journal of global health
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29619212
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180405
LR  - 20180405
IS  - 2047-2986 (Electronic)
IS  - 2047-2978 (Linking)
VI  - 8
IP  - 1
DP  - 2018 Jun
TI  - Validity of maternal report of care-seeking for childhood illness.
PG  - 010602
LID - 10.7189/jogh.08.010602 [doi]
AB  - Background: Accurate data on care-seeking for child illness are needed to improve
      public health programs and reduce child mortality. The accuracy of maternal
      report of care-seeking for child illness as collected through household surveys
      has not been validated. Methods: A 2016 survey compared reported care-seeking
      against a gold-standard of health care provider documented care-seeking events
      among a random sample of mothers of children <5 years in Southern Province,
      Zambia. Enrolled children were assigned cards with unique barcodes. Seventy-five 
      health care providers were given smartphones with a barcode reader and instructed
      to scan the cards of participating children seeking care at the source,
      generating an electronic record of the care-seeking event. Additionally,
      providers gave all caregivers accessing care for a child <5 years
      provider-specific tokens used to verify the point of care during the household
      survey. Reported care-seeking events were ascertained in each household using a
      questionnaire modeled off the Zambia Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) /
      Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS). The accuracy of maternal report of
      care-seeking behavior was estimated by comparing care-seeking events reported by 
      mothers against provider-documented events. Results: Data were collected on 384
      children with fever, diarrhea, and/or symptoms of ARI in the preceding 2 weeks.
      Most children sought care from government facilities or community-based agents
      (CBAs). We found high sensitivity (Rural: 0.91, 95% confidence interval CI
      0.84-0.95; Urban: 0.98, 95% CI 0.92-0.99) and reasonable specificity (Rural:
      0.71, 95% CI 0.57-0.82; Urban: 0.76, 95% CI 0.62-0.85) of maternal report of
      care-seeking for child illness by type of provider. Maternal report of any
      care-seeking and seeking care from a skilled provider had slightly higher
      sensitivity and specificity. Seeking care from a traditional practitioner was
      associated with lower odds of accurately reporting the event, while seeking care 
      from a government provider was associated with greater odds of accurate report.
      The measure resulted in a slight overestimation of true care-seeking behavior in 
      the study population. Conclusions: Maternal report is a valid measure of
      care-seeking for child illness in settings with high utilization of public sector
      providers. The study findings were limited by the low diversity in care-seeking
      practices for child illness and the exclusion of shops.
FAU - Carter, Emily D
AU  - Carter ED
AD  - Institute for International Programs, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
      Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
FAU - Ndhlovu, Micky
AU  - Ndhlovu M
AD  - Chainama College of Health Sciences, Lusaka, Zambia.
FAU - Munos, Melinda
AU  - Munos M
AD  - Institute for International Programs, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
      Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
FAU - Nkhama, Emmy
AU  - Nkhama E
AD  - Chainama College of Health Sciences, Lusaka, Zambia.
FAU - Katz, Joanne
AU  - Katz J
AD  - Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
FAU - Eisele, Thomas P
AU  - Eisele TP
AD  - Center for Applied Malaria Research and Evaluation (CAMRE), Tulane University
      School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - Scotland
TA  - J Glob Health
JT  - Journal of global health
JID - 101578780
SB  - IM
MH  - Acute Disease
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Child Health Services/*utilization
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Diarrhea/*therapy
MH  - Female
MH  - Fever/*therapy
MH  - *Health Care Surveys
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Male
MH  - Mothers/*psychology/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Patient Acceptance of Health Care/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Public Sector/utilization
MH  - Reproducibility of Results
MH  - Respiratory Tract Infections/*therapy
MH  - Young Adult
MH  - Zambia
PMC - PMC5854307
COIS- Competing interests: All authors have completed the ICMJE uniform disclosure form
      at http://www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf (available upon request from the
      corresponding author) and declare no conflicts of interest. Harry Campbell is an 
      Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Global Health. To ensure that any possible
      conflict of interest relevant to the journal has been addressed, this article was
      reviewed according to best practice guidelines of international editorial
      organizations.
EDAT- 2018/04/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/06 06:01
CRDT- 2018/04/06 06:00
PHST- 2018/04/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/04/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/06 06:01 [medline]
AID - 10.7189/jogh.08.010602 [doi]
AID - jogh-08-010602 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Glob Health. 2018 Jun;8(1):010602. doi: 10.7189/jogh.08.010602.