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Decreased postural control in people with moderate hearing loss.

Abstract Balance is a complex process that involves multiple sensory integrations. The auditory, visual, and vestibular systems are the main contributors. Hearing loss or hearing impairment may induce inappropriate postural strategies that could affect balance and therefore increase the risk of falling.The aim of this study was to understand whether hearing loss could influence balance, cervical posture, and muscle activation in the cervical region.Thirteen patients (61 ± 13 years; 161.8 ± 11.0 cm; 70.5 ± 15.9 kg) with moderate hearing loss (Right ear -60 ± 21 dB; Left ear -61 ± 24 dB) underwent: an audiometric examination, a postural examination (with open and closed eyes) through a stabilometric platform, a cervical ROM examination through a head accelerometer, and a sternocleidomastoid electromyography (EMG) examination.A linear regression analysis has shown a regression coefficient (R) 0.76 and 0.69 between hearing loss and the posturographic parameters, on the sagittal sway, with open and closed eyes, respectively. The combination of frontal and sagittal sway is able to explain up to 84% of the variance of the audiometric assessment. No differences were found between right and left hemibody between the audiometric, posturographic, cervical ROM parameters, and in EMG amplitude. ROM and EMG parameters have not shown any significant associations with hearing loss, for both right and left head rotation.Hearing loss is associated to increased posturographic measures, especially the sagittal sway, underlining a reduced postural control in people with hearing impairments. No association was found between the heads posture and neck activation with hearing loss. Hearing loss may be associated with an increased risk of falls.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29620637
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180416
LR  - 20180416
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 14
DP  - 2018 Apr
TI  - Decreased postural control in people with moderate hearing loss.
PG  - e0244
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010244 [doi]
AB  - Balance is a complex process that involves multiple sensory integrations. The
      auditory, visual, and vestibular systems are the main contributors. Hearing loss 
      or hearing impairment may induce inappropriate postural strategies that could
      affect balance and therefore increase the risk of falling.The aim of this study
      was to understand whether hearing loss could influence balance, cervical posture,
      and muscle activation in the cervical region.Thirteen patients (61 +/- 13 years; 
      161.8 +/- 11.0 cm; 70.5 +/- 15.9 kg) with moderate hearing loss (Right ear -60
      +/- 21 dB; Left ear -61 +/- 24 dB) underwent: an audiometric examination, a
      postural examination (with open and closed eyes) through a stabilometric
      platform, a cervical ROM examination through a head accelerometer, and a
      sternocleidomastoid electromyography (EMG) examination.A linear regression
      analysis has shown a regression coefficient (R) 0.76 and 0.69 between hearing
      loss and the posturographic parameters, on the sagittal sway, with open and
      closed eyes, respectively. The combination of frontal and sagittal sway is able
      to explain up to 84% of the variance of the audiometric assessment. No
      differences were found between right and left hemibody between the audiometric,
      posturographic, cervical ROM parameters, and in EMG amplitude. ROM and EMG
      parameters have not shown any significant associations with hearing loss, for
      both right and left head rotation.Hearing loss is associated to increased
      posturographic measures, especially the sagittal sway, underlining a reduced
      postural control in people with hearing impairments. No association was found
      between the heads posture and neck activation with hearing loss. Hearing loss may
      be associated with an increased risk of falls.
FAU - Thomas, Ewan
AU  - Thomas E
AD  - Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit.
FAU - Martines, Francesco
AU  - Martines F
AD  - Bio.Ne.C. Department, ENT Section, University of Palermo.
FAU - Bianco, Antonino
AU  - Bianco A
AD  - Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit.
FAU - Messina, Giuseppe
AU  - Messina G
AD  - Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit.
AD  - PosturaLab Center, Palermo, Italy.
FAU - Giustino, Valerio
AU  - Giustino V
AD  - Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit.
FAU - Zangla, Daniele
AU  - Zangla D
AD  - Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit.
FAU - Iovane, Angelo
AU  - Iovane A
AD  - Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit.
FAU - Palma, Antonio
AU  - Palma A
AD  - Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Accelerometry/methods
MH  - Aged
MH  - Audiometry/methods
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Electromyography/methods
MH  - Female
MH  - Head/physiopathology
MH  - Hearing Loss/*physiopathology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Neck/physiopathology
MH  - Postural Balance/*physiology
MH  - Posture/*physiology
EDAT- 2018/04/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/17 06:00
CRDT- 2018/04/06 06:00
PHST- 2018/04/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/04/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/17 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010244 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201804060-00015 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Apr;97(14):e0244. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000010244.