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Nurses' objective knowledge regarding venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: A national survey study.

Abstract Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common vascular disorder with high mortality and morbidity. Clinical nurses are a pivotal group that can serve as first-line health care providers. Lack of knowledge about VTE is an important barrier to effective nursing performance. This study aimed to determine nurses' knowledge of VTE prophylaxis through a nationwide survey across China, to understand gaps between current knowledge, and guidelines, and to help improve clinical nursing.The survey included 5 topics with 68 items on VTE, including basic knowledge, risk assessment, basic prophylaxis, physical prophylaxis, and pharmacological prophylaxis.The survey was distributed to 106 AAA-grade hospitals throughout China; 5218 valid questionnaires were submitted for analysis. There were 5097 women and 121 men respondents, with average age 30.29 ± 8.60 years. The average rate of correct responses regarding VTE knowledge was 59.90 ± 15.63%; 77.81% of subjects answered more than half of the survey items correctly. Better knowledge about thromboprophylaxis was observed among nurses who were more highly educated, more experienced, had received continuing education, intensive care unit (ICU), and lead nurses. Correct response rates were 68.39 ± 17.03%, 60.35 ± 21.01%, 75.51 ± 22.85%, 41.72 ± 17.47%, and 46.01 ± 21.22% for basic knowledge, risk assessment, basic prophylaxis, physical prophylaxis, and pharmacological prophylaxis, respectively.Respondents showed satisfactory results regarding basic prophylaxis, basic knowledge, and risk assessment for VTE; respondents had poorer knowledge regarding physical and pharmacological prophylaxis. Better mastery of knowledge about thromboprophylaxis was observed among nurses who were more highly educated, more experienced, had received continuous education, ICU, and lead nurses.This study suggested that nurse trainers should develop comprehensive educational programs that focus on low correct rate aspects. Higher-level continuous education could improve nurses' knowledge of thromboprophylaxis.
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Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice

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Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29620660
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180416
LR  - 20180416
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 14
DP  - 2018 Apr
TI  - Nurses' objective knowledge regarding venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: A
      national survey study.
PG  - e0338
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010338 [doi]
AB  - Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common vascular disorder with high mortality
      and morbidity. Clinical nurses are a pivotal group that can serve as first-line
      health care providers. Lack of knowledge about VTE is an important barrier to
      effective nursing performance. This study aimed to determine nurses' knowledge of
      VTE prophylaxis through a nationwide survey across China, to understand gaps
      between current knowledge, and guidelines, and to help improve clinical
      nursing.The survey included 5 topics with 68 items on VTE, including basic
      knowledge, risk assessment, basic prophylaxis, physical prophylaxis, and
      pharmacological prophylaxis.The survey was distributed to 106 AAA-grade hospitals
      throughout China; 5218 valid questionnaires were submitted for analysis. There
      were 5097 women and 121 men respondents, with average age 30.29 +/- 8.60 years.
      The average rate of correct responses regarding VTE knowledge was 59.90 +/-
      15.63%; 77.81% of subjects answered more than half of the survey items correctly.
      Better knowledge about thromboprophylaxis was observed among nurses who were more
      highly educated, more experienced, had received continuing education, intensive
      care unit (ICU), and lead nurses. Correct response rates were 68.39 +/- 17.03%,
      60.35 +/- 21.01%, 75.51 +/- 22.85%, 41.72 +/- 17.47%, and 46.01 +/- 21.22% for
      basic knowledge, risk assessment, basic prophylaxis, physical prophylaxis, and
      pharmacological prophylaxis, respectively.Respondents showed satisfactory results
      regarding basic prophylaxis, basic knowledge, and risk assessment for VTE;
      respondents had poorer knowledge regarding physical and pharmacological
      prophylaxis. Better mastery of knowledge about thromboprophylaxis was observed
      among nurses who were more highly educated, more experienced, had received
      continuous education, ICU, and lead nurses.This study suggested that nurse
      trainers should develop comprehensive educational programs that focus on low
      correct rate aspects. Higher-level continuous education could improve nurses'
      knowledge of thromboprophylaxis.
FAU - Ma, Yu-Fen
AU  - Ma YF
AD  - Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Peking Union 
      Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.
FAU - Xu, Yuan
AU  - Xu Y
FAU - Chen, Ya-Ping
AU  - Chen YP
FAU - Wang, Xiao-Jie
AU  - Wang XJ
FAU - Deng, Hai-Bo
AU  - Deng HB
FAU - He, Yu
AU  - He Y
FAU - Wu, Xin-Juan
AU  - Wu XJ
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
RN  - 0 (Anticoagulants)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Anticoagulants/therapeutic use
MH  - China
MH  - Female
MH  - *Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Nurse Clinicians/education/*psychology
MH  - Primary Prevention/education/methods
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Venous Thromboembolism/nursing/*prevention & control
EDAT- 2018/04/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/04/17 06:00
CRDT- 2018/04/06 06:00
PHST- 2018/04/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/04/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/04/17 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010338 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201804060-00038 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Apr;97(14):e0338. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000010338.