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Entrapment of a metal foreign body in the cervical spinal canal during surgical procedure: A case report.

Abstract Retention of foreign objects in spinal canal usually results from penetrating spinal trauma or failed internal instruments. However, entrapment of a foreign body in cervical spinal canal during surgery is rare, and whether such an object may cause neurological complications remains unknown in literature.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29703036
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180507
LR  - 20180516
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 17
DP  - 2018 Apr
TI  - Entrapment of a metal foreign body in the cervical spinal canal during surgical
      procedure: A case report.
PG  - e0548
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010548 [doi]
AB  - RATIONALE: Retention of foreign objects in spinal canal usually results from
      penetrating spinal trauma or failed internal instruments. However, entrapment of 
      a foreign body in cervical spinal canal during surgery is rare, and whether such 
      an object may cause neurological complications remains unknown in literature.
      PATIENT CONCERNS: A 50-year-old man underwent C5 corpectomy and instrumentation
      surgery due to cervical myelopathy. During the surgery, the cutting edge of a
      Kerrison rongeur was broken and the metal tip was retained behind C4 vertebra.
      DIAGNOSIS: Retention of foreign body in the cervical spinal canal. INTERVENTIONS:
      To remove the metal object, multiple strategies were tried but all failed. As
      such a metal object was thought to be dangerous to the spinal cord, a remedy C4
      corpectomy was performed to remove it. Accidentally, however, the metal fragment 
      further migrated to C2/3 canal. At last, the metal fragment had to be retained in
      the cervical spinal canal. OUTCOMES: At 2-year follow-up, the metal fragment
      remained in situ and no delayed complications occurred. LESSONS: We reported a
      rare case of metal object retention in cervical spinal canal due to rongeur
      fatigue fractures. Under certain circumstances, retention of a small foreign
      object in spinal canal may not lead to neurological complications. If failed to
      remove an entrapped foreign body, it may be safe to leave it in the spinal canal 
      for further observation.
FAU - Lv, Xiaoqiang
AU  - Lv X
AD  - Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Dongyang People's Hospital, Dongyang.
FAU - Lu, Xuan
AU  - Lu X
AD  - Spine lab, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital,
      College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
FAU - Wang, Yue
AU  - Wang Y
AD  - Spine lab, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital,
      College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Cervical Vertebrae/surgery
MH  - Decompression, Surgical/*adverse effects
MH  - Foreign Bodies/etiology/*surgery
MH  - Foreign-Body Migration/*diagnostic imaging
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Postoperative Complications/*diagnostic imaging
MH  - Spinal Canal/*diagnostic imaging
MH  - Spinal Cord Diseases/surgery
PMC - PMC5944471
EDAT- 2018/04/29 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/08 06:00
CRDT- 2018/04/29 06:00
PHST- 2018/04/29 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/04/29 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/08 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010548 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201804270-00068 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Apr;97(17):e0548. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000010548.