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Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: A systematic review.

Abstract Solitary rectal ulcer (SRUS) may mislead the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or rectal polyps, which may reduce the actual prevalence of it. Various treatments for SRUS have been described that can be referred to therapeutic strategies such as biofeedback, enema of corticosteroid, topical therapy, and rectal mucosectomy. Nevertheless, biofeedback should be considered as the first stage of treatment, while surgical procedures have been offered for those who do not respond to conservative management and biofeedback or those who have total rectal prolapse and rectal full-thickness.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29718850
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180514
LR  - 20180514
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 18
DP  - 2018 May
TI  - Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: A systematic review.
PG  - e0565
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010565 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Solitary rectal ulcer (SRUS) may mislead the inflammatory bowel
      disease (IBD) or rectal polyps, which may reduce the actual prevalence of it.
      Various treatments for SRUS have been described that can be referred to
      therapeutic strategies such as biofeedback, enema of corticosteroid, topical
      therapy, and rectal mucosectomy. Nevertheless, biofeedback should be considered
      as the first stage of treatment, while surgical procedures have been offered for 
      those who do not respond to conservative management and biofeedback or those who 
      have total rectal prolapse and rectal full-thickness. METHODS: A systematic and
      comprehensive search will be performed using MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE,
      AMED, the Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. RESULTS: The results of this
      systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: To
      our knowledge, our study discusses the factors involved in the pathogenesis,
      clinical symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and management of patients. This review 
      can provide recommended strategies in a comprehensive and targeted vision for
      patients suffering from this syndrome.
FAU - Forootan, Mojgan
AU  - Forootan M
AD  - Department of Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research
      Center (RCGLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences.
FAU - Darvishi, Mohammad
AU  - Darvishi M
AD  - Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Research Center (IDTMRC), Department of
      Aerospace and Subaquatic Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran,
      Iran.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Administration, Topical
MH  - Biofeedback, Psychology/methods
MH  - Conservative Treatment/methods
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Rectal Diseases/*therapy
MH  - Rectum/*pathology
MH  - Ulcer/*therapy
EDAT- 2018/05/03 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/15 06:00
CRDT- 2018/05/03 06:00
PHST- 2018/05/03 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/05/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/15 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010565 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201805040-00018 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 May;97(18):e0565. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000010565.