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Marital status and survival in patients with rectal cancer: A population-based STROBE cohort study.

Abstract To examine the impact of marital status on overall survival (OS) and rectal cancer-specific survival (RCSS) for aged patients.We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database to identify aged patients (>65 years) with early stage rectal cancer (RC) (T1-T4, N0, M0) in the United States from 2004 to 2010. Propensity score matching was conducted to avoid potential confounding factors with ratio at 1:1. We used Kaplan-Meier to compare OS and RCSS between the married patients and the unmarried, respectively. We used cox proportion hazard regressions to obtain hazard rates for OS, and proportional subdistribution hazard model was performed to calculate hazard rates for RCSS.Totally, 5196 patients were included. The married (2598 [50%]) aged patients had better crude 5-year overall survival rate (64.2% vs 57.3%, P < .001) and higher crude 5-year cancer-specific survival rate (80% vs 75.9%, P < .001) than the unmarried (2598 (50%)), respectively. In multivariate analyses, married patients had significantly lower overall death than unmarried patients (HR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.71-0.83, P < .001), while aged married patients had no cancer-specific survival benefit versus the unmarried aged patients (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.81-1.04, P = .17).Among old population, married patients with early stage RC had better OS than the unmarried, while current evidence showed that marital status might have no protective effect on cancer-specific survival.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Rectal Neoplasms

Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29718875
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180509
LR  - 20180509
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 18
DP  - 2018 May
TI  - Marital status and survival in patients with rectal cancer: A population-based
      STROBE cohort study.
PG  - e0637
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010637 [doi]
AB  - To examine the impact of marital status on overall survival (OS) and rectal
      cancer-specific survival (RCSS) for aged patients.We used the Surveillance,
      Epidemiology and End Results database to identify aged patients (&gt;65 years) with 
      early stage rectal cancer (RC) (T1-T4, N0, M0) in the United States from 2004 to 
      2010. Propensity score matching was conducted to avoid potential confounding
      factors with ratio at 1:1. We used Kaplan-Meier to compare OS and RCSS between
      the married patients and the unmarried, respectively. We used cox proportion
      hazard regressions to obtain hazard rates for OS, and proportional
      subdistribution hazard model was performed to calculate hazard rates for
      RCSS.Totally, 5196 patients were included. The married (2598 [50%]) aged patients
      had better crude 5-year overall survival rate (64.2% vs 57.3%, P &lt; .001) and
      higher crude 5-year cancer-specific survival rate (80% vs 75.9%, P &lt; .001) than
      the unmarried (2598 (50%)), respectively. In multivariate analyses, married
      patients had significantly lower overall death than unmarried patients (HR =
      0.77, 95% CI = 0.71-0.83, P &lt; .001), while aged married patients had no
      cancer-specific survival benefit versus the unmarried aged patients (HR = 0.92,
      95% CI = 0.81-1.04, P = .17).Among old population, married patients with early
      stage RC had better OS than the unmarried, while current evidence showed that
      marital status might have no protective effect on cancer-specific survival.
FAU - Li, Zhuyue
AU  - Li Z
AD  - West China Hospital/West China School of Nursing.
AD  - Institute of Hospital Management, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China.
FAU - Wang, Kang
AU  - Wang K
AD  - Department of the Endocrine and Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of 
      Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing.
FAU - Zhang, Xuemei
AU  - Zhang X
AD  - Center of Gerontology and Geriatrics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University,
      Chengdu, China.
FAU - Wen, Jin
AU  - Wen J
AD  - Institute of Hospital Management, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Aged
MH  - China/epidemiology
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Kaplan-Meier Estimate
MH  - Male
MH  - Marital Status/*statistics &amp; numerical data
MH  - Mortality
MH  - Population Groups
MH  - Population Surveillance
MH  - Propensity Score
MH  - *Rectal Neoplasms/epidemiology/mortality
EDAT- 2018/05/03 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/10 06:00
CRDT- 2018/05/03 06:00
PHST- 2018/05/03 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/05/03 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/10 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010637 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201805040-00043 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 May;97(18):e0637. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000010637.