PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Retention of children under 18 months testing HIV positive in care in Swaziland: a retrospective study.

Abstract Significant progress has been made with respect to the initiation of children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Southern Africa including Swaziland, however retention of these children in care poses a major challenge. The aim of the study was to assess retention to care in children testing HIV positive taking into account the number of return child welfare care (CWC) visits the child made.
PMID
Related Publications

Predictors of survival among HIV-positive children on ART in Swaziland.

Optimisation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children under 3 years of age.

Effectiveness of a combination strategy for linkage and retention in adult HIV care in Swaziland: The Link4Health cluster randomized trial.

A qualitative analysis of the barriers to antiretroviral therapy initiation among children 2 to 18 months of age in Swaziland.

Outcomes and challenges of scaling up comprehensive PMTCT services in rural Swaziland, Southern Africa.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Retention into care

Swaziland

antiretroviral treatment

Journal Title the pan african medical journal
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29721146
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
LR  - 20180503
IS  - 1937-8688 (Electronic)
VI  - 28
DP  - 2017
TI  - Retention of children under 18 months testing HIV positive in care in Swaziland: 
      a retrospective study.
PG  - 316
LID - 10.11604/pamj.2017.28.316.13857 [doi]
AB  - Introduction: Significant progress has been made with respect to the initiation
      of children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Southern Africa including
      Swaziland, however retention of these children in care poses a major challenge.
      The aim of the study was to assess retention to care in children testing HIV
      positive taking into account the number of return child welfare care (CWC) visits
      the child made. Methods: A retrospective cross sectional study and was conducted 
      at 4 facilities in Swaziland. All children who were HIV infected from 0 to 18
      months were identified using the child welfare register (CWC). Infant
      characteristics were obtained from the child welfare register and early infant
      diagnosis logbooks. Proportion of patients retained in care were calculated at
      three, six, nine and twelve months. Results: Of the 32 HIV positive children
      identified tested between December 2014 up to July 2016, sixty eight percent (n =
      22) of the children that tested HIV positive were retained at three months, 40.6%
      at six months, 18.8% at nine months and 12.5% at twelve months. Children that
      resided in urban areas, more male than female children, children from mothers who
      were on antiretroviral treatment, children initiated on antiretroviral treatment,
      mothers on antiretroviral treatment for more than one year and children who
      received Infant Nevirapine were more likely to be retained. Conclusion:
      Facilities are performing well in terms of identifying HIV positive children
      within the first two months of life and linking them into care. However, as time 
      progresses the retention of children in care declines. Innovative strategies need
      to be developed to enhance patient retention.
FAU - Sikhondze, Nomvuselelo
AU  - Sikhondze N
AD  - Discipline of Public Health Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South 
      Africa.
FAU - Mahomed, Ozayr Haroon
AU  - Mahomed OH
AD  - Discipline of Public Health Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South 
      Africa.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20171226
PL  - Uganda
TA  - Pan Afr Med J
JT  - The Pan African medical journal
JID - 101517926
PMC - PMC5927566
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Retention into care
OT  - Swaziland
OT  - antiretroviral treatment
EDAT- 2018/05/04 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/04 06:00
CRDT- 2018/05/04 06:00
PHST- 2017/09/11 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/10/06 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/05/04 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/05/04 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/04 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.11604/pamj.2017.28.316.13857 [doi]
AID - PAMJ-28-316 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Pan Afr Med J. 2017 Dec 26;28:316. doi: 10.11604/pamj.2017.28.316.13857.
      eCollection 2017.