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Traumatic fractures resulting from collisions in children and adolescents: A retrospective observational study.

Abstract To investigate the incidence and pattern of child and adolescent (≤18 years old) traumatic fractures (TFs) as a result of collisions.We retrospectively reviewed 270 child and adolescent patients (228 males and 42 females aged 12.8 ± 5.1 years old) with TFs as a result of collisions admitted to our university-affiliated hospitals from 2001 to 2010. The incidence and patterns were summarized with respect to different age groups, sex, etiology, and whether the patient presented with nerve injury.The most common etiologies were struck by object (105, 38.9%) and wounded by person (74, 27.4%). The most common fracture sites were upper limb fractures (126, 46.7%) and craniofacial fractures (82, 30.4%). A total of 65 (24.1%) patients suffered a nerve injury. The frequency of early and late complications/associated injuries was 35.6% (n = 96) and 8.5% (n = 23), respectively. The mean age (P = .001) and frequency of wounded by person (P = .038) was significantly larger in male than in female patients. The frequency of earthquake injury (P < .001) and lower limb fractures (P = .002) was significantly larger in females than in male patients. The frequency of upper limb fracture was significantly higher in the wounded by machine group (83.3%) than in the other groups (all P < .05). The frequency of lower limb fractures was significantly higher in the earthquake injury group (64.7%) than in the other groups (all P < .05). The frequency of craniofacial fracture was significantly higher in the wounded by person group (54.1%) than in the other groups (all P < .05). The emergency admission rate (P = .047), frequency of wounded by person (P < .001), craniofacial fracture (P < .001), and early complications/associated injuries (P < .001) were significantly larger in patients with nerve injury than in other patients.Struck by object and upper limb fractures were the most common etiology and site, respectively. Wounded by person and craniofacial fractures were risk factors for nerve injury. Therefore, we should pay more attention to patients wounded by person, presenting with craniofacial fracture, to find whether there is nerve injury.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29794770
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180604
LR  - 20180604
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 21
DP  - 2018 May
TI  - Traumatic fractures resulting from collisions in children and adolescents: A
      retrospective observational study.
PG  - e10821
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010821 [doi]
AB  - To investigate the incidence and pattern of child and adolescent (&lt;/=18 years
      old) traumatic fractures (TFs) as a result of collisions.We retrospectively
      reviewed 270 child and adolescent patients (228 males and 42 females aged 12.8
      +/- 5.1 years old) with TFs as a result of collisions admitted to our
      university-affiliated hospitals from 2001 to 2010. The incidence and patterns
      were summarized with respect to different age groups, sex, etiology, and whether 
      the patient presented with nerve injury.The most common etiologies were struck by
      object (105, 38.9%) and wounded by person (74, 27.4%). The most common fracture
      sites were upper limb fractures (126, 46.7%) and craniofacial fractures (82,
      30.4%). A total of 65 (24.1%) patients suffered a nerve injury. The frequency of 
      early and late complications/associated injuries was 35.6% (n = 96) and 8.5% (n =
      23), respectively. The mean age (P = .001) and frequency of wounded by person (P 
      = .038) was significantly larger in male than in female patients. The frequency
      of earthquake injury (P &lt; .001) and lower limb fractures (P = .002) was
      significantly larger in females than in male patients. The frequency of upper
      limb fracture was significantly higher in the wounded by machine group (83.3%)
      than in the other groups (all P &lt; .05). The frequency of lower limb fractures was
      significantly higher in the earthquake injury group (64.7%) than in the other
      groups (all P &lt; .05). The frequency of craniofacial fracture was significantly
      higher in the wounded by person group (54.1%) than in the other groups (all P &lt;
      .05). The emergency admission rate (P = .047), frequency of wounded by person (P 
      &lt; .001), craniofacial fracture (P &lt; .001), and early complications/associated
      injuries (P &lt; .001) were significantly larger in patients with nerve injury than 
      in other patients.Struck by object and upper limb fractures were the most common 
      etiology and site, respectively. Wounded by person and craniofacial fractures
      were risk factors for nerve injury. Therefore, we should pay more attention to
      patients wounded by person, presenting with craniofacial fracture, to find
      whether there is nerve injury.
FAU - Wang, Hongwei
AU  - Wang H
AD  - Department of Orthopedics, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Area Command of 
      Chinese PLA.
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese
      Academy of Science, Shenyang, Liaoning.
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology,
      Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei.
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Third Military Medical 
      University, Chongqing.
FAU - Liu, Huan
AU  - Liu H
AD  - Department of Orthopedics, Affiliated Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital,
      Southwest Medical University, Luzhou.
FAU - Zhang, Song
AU  - Zhang S
AD  - Department of Radiology, Xinqiao Hospital.
FAU - Li, Changqing
AU  - Li C
AD  - Department of Orthopedics.
FAU - Zhou, Yue
AU  - Zhou Y
AD  - Department of Orthopedics.
FAU - Liu, Jun
AU  - Liu J
AD  - Department of Orthopedics, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Area Command of 
      Chinese PLA.
FAU - Ou, Lan
AU  - Ou L
AD  - Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, The Third Military Medical
      University, Chongqing, China.
FAU - Xiang, Liangbi
AU  - Xiang L
AD  - Department of Orthopedics, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Area Command of 
      Chinese PLA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Observational Study
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Child
MH  - Facial Bones/*injuries/pathology
MH  - Female
MH  - Fractures, Bone/complications/*epidemiology/*etiology
MH  - Hospitalization/statistics &amp; numerical data
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Lower Extremity/*injuries/pathology
MH  - Male
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Skull Fractures/complications/epidemiology/pathology
MH  - Trauma, Nervous System/*complications/epidemiology/etiology
MH  - Upper Extremity/*injuries/pathology
EDAT- 2018/05/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/06/05 06:00
CRDT- 2018/05/26 06:00
PHST- 2018/05/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/05/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/06/05 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000010821 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201805250-00046 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 May;97(21):e10821. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000010821.