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Meningioma and the ophthalmologist. A review of 80 cases.

Abstract We reviewed the charts of all patients with pathologically proven meningiomas who were admitted to the Montreal General Hospital between 1960 and 1977. Of the 80 patients reviewed, we found approximately one third of them had ophthalmological symptoms of which visual loss, field defect, and diplopia were the most common. Most of these patients also had neurological symptoms, but they were often nonspecific. One half of the patients presented with chronic symptomatology such as headache, mental change, and visual loss. One third of the patients presented acutely with seizures, hemiplegia, or dysphasia. Of the investigations done, the angiogram and brain scan were most often diagnostic, while the skull x-ray and EEG were often normal. Meningioma of the sphenoidal ridge, parasellar area, and occiput most often produced visual deficits. In almost one half of these patients, the visual deficit was initially misdiagnosed.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title ophthalmology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 7335302
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 19820521
LR  - 20041117
IS  - 0161-6420 (Print)
IS  - 0161-6420 (Linking)
VI  - 88
IP  - 10
DP  - 1981 Oct
TI  - Meningioma and the ophthalmologist. A review of 80 cases.
PG  - 1004-9
AB  - We reviewed the charts of all patients with pathologically proven meningiomas who
      were admitted to the Montreal General Hospital between 1960 and 1977. Of the 80
      patients reviewed, we found approximately one third of them had ophthalmological 
      symptoms of which visual loss, field defect, and diplopia were the most common.
      Most of these patients also had neurological symptoms, but they were often
      nonspecific. One half of the patients presented with chronic symptomatology such 
      as headache, mental change, and visual loss. One third of the patients presented 
      acutely with seizures, hemiplegia, or dysphasia. Of the investigations done, the 
      angiogram and brain scan were most often diagnostic, while the skull x-ray and
      EEG were often normal. Meningioma of the sphenoidal ridge, parasellar area, and
      occiput most often produced visual deficits. In almost one half of these
      patients, the visual deficit was initially misdiagnosed.
FAU - Anderson, D
AU  - Anderson D
FAU - Khalil, M
AU  - Khalil M
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Ophthalmology
JT  - Ophthalmology
JID - 7802443
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Diplopia/etiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Meningeal Neoplasms/*complications/diagnosis
MH  - Meningioma/*complications/diagnosis
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Papilledema/etiology
MH  - Scotoma/etiology
MH  - Vision Disorders/*etiology
EDAT- 1981/10/01 00:00
MHDA- 1981/10/01 00:01
CRDT- 1981/10/01 00:00
PHST- 1981/10/01 00:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 1981/10/01 00:01 [medline]
PHST- 1981/10/01 00:00 [entrez]
AID - S0161-6420(81)80028-0 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Ophthalmology. 1981 Oct;88(10):1004-9.